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Extracting copper from malachite (copper carbonate) by using a redox reaction

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Introduction

Extracting copper from malachite (copper carbonate) by using a redox reaction Aim Our aim is to extract copper from copper carbonate using a redox reaction. What is a redox reaction Reduction equals loss of oxygen Oxidation is the gain of oxygen O-Oxidation I-is L-loss OF ELECTRONS R-reduction I-is G-gain Prediction When I heat copper carbonate I expect it to turn from green to black because it's changing the copper oxide. The copper carbonate is being reduced. Copper oxide + carbon carbon dioxide + copper 2CuO C CO2 2Cu Black Pink Copper oxide will be reduced to turn into copper as it loses oxygen. This is called a redox reaction. ...read more.

Middle

10. Calculate the percentage yield. Equipment Test tube Bunsen burner Filter paper Filter funnel Glass rod Scales Spatula Tongs Heatproof mat Beaker Water Top pan balance Charcoal 1.5 g copper carbonate Safety * Wear goggles at all times * Heat copper carbonate on blue flame to stop it rising out of the tube. * If it does start to rise take it off the heat. Sources of error Whilst doing this experiment there are a few errors that may occur. The first being that the gas used to power the Bunsen burner just wasn't powerful enough. If this is the case change the gas tap. Another error that may occur is that the scales may not be 100% accurate. ...read more.

Conclusion

96 =246 Molecular mass of copper Atom Number Atomic mass Molecular mass Cu 2 63 126 126g Percentage yield of copper Actual yield � theoretical yield X100 = 67.75% Evaluation During this experiment there are many factors to consider as well as potential problems that may occur. Although overall our experiment was a success, the percentage yield was not what we expected. I believe that this was due to some of our copper residue getting stuck within the test tube whilst we were trying to extract it. Another problem that we occurred was the Bunsen burner was just not powerful enough and caused us to change Bunsen burner half way through the experiment. This could be an explanation as to why our results were slightly strange. Richard Aldridge 10 Gordon ...read more.

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Here's what a star student thought of this essay

4 star(s)

Response to the question

The focus of the question and the layout of the experiment is done very well for this level of essay. The candidate considers things that may go wrong in the experiment and accounts for them. They relate their data ...

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Response to the question

The focus of the question and the layout of the experiment is done very well for this level of essay. The candidate considers things that may go wrong in the experiment and accounts for them. They relate their data and observations to scientific equations which is good to show a linked understanding of the procedure of the experiment.

Level of analysis

The candidate introduces and explains a redox reaction in good basic terms what I would expect from this level. The candidate incorrectly uses chemical notation. I'm not sure about the colour changes as they contradict themselves in their prediction and then in the experiment notation. Equations are done accurately. Their colour changes become more apparent during the method so this should be made clearer earlier on in the text. Their method is done well and is easy to read and understand. The sources of error are explained well and possible improvements also suggested. Percentage yield is calculated well but the decimal places used are not consistent, and this should happen to make the calculation as accurate as possible. They evaluate the experiment well.

Quality of writing

Punctuation, grammar and spelling all to a good level. The candidate uses a clear, easy to read format with good use of subheadings.


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Reviewed by skatealexia 21/08/2012

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