• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11

factors affecting the errosion of a magnesium statue

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In my garden I have a metal statue made mostly of magnesium. I have noticed that during the year it corrodes at different rates. In this assignment I want to find out why the statue in my garden made mostly of magnesium corrodes at different rates at different times of the year. This could be due a number of environmental conditions and changes that take place throughout the year. In this assignment I will demonstrate using my own knowledge why this occurs. In everyday life I am familiar with many chemical reactions that take place at different rates. There are many factors that affect rate of reaction, e.g.; temperature, surface area, concentration and catalysts, each in a different length of time and way. Temperature is a great effecter of chemical change. As the temperature of the atoms in a substance increase, they are able to move faster as energy is passed onto them through heat. At higher temperatures more collisions take place, when a collision occurs, there is more chance that the collision will lead to a reaction. The theory that we use to explain how different variables change the rate of reaction is called the collision theory. For a reaction to take place, the particles of the substances that are reacting have to collide. If they collide, with enough energy then they will react. The minimum amount of kinetic (movement) ...read more.

Middle

* Next I will measure out 50 cm� of sulphuric acid, using a measuring cylinder, and pour the sulphuric acid into a beaker. * Next I will take a 5cm magnesium strip, making sure the strip it is flat, and drop it in the all acid solution. As soon I drop the strip into the acid I will start the timer. * I will then stop the timer when the magnesium has completely dissolved and record the time in my table. * I will repeat this 4 more times but I dilute the acid with more water every time. * The second time there will be 40cm� of acid and 10cm� of water * The third time there will be 30cm� of acid and 20cm� of water, recording my results each time. * I will continue this until there is 40cm� of water and 10cm� of acid in the beaker. * I will conduct the experiment a second time to get the most accurate results I can. * I will wear an apron at all times. * I will wear goggles at all times. * Any acid spills that might happen, I will clean it up with a damp cloth. * Chairs and school bags will be tucked in under the table. Possible sources of error; * Magnesium strip not being placed flat on the surface of the acid. ...read more.

Conclusion

* More than 1 person is needed. * Plotting the points. I would have obtained a graph which looks like the following if I had used a gas syringe during the experiment: I also could have done more to improve the accuracy of this experiment; * Ensuring timings are accurate. * Measuring the volumes of water and sulphuric acid accurately (concentrations are correct). * Ensuring magnesium strip is placed in sulphuric acid flat. * Repeating experiment another 1 or 2 times. In my experiment I had to repeat a few results which did not fit with my other results. Results which did not fit my pattern could have been obtained because the magnesium strip was dirty or not flatly laid out and another was, there could have been temperature fluctuations, beakers were not rinsed out thoroughly or the timer could have been off time on insertion of the magnesium into the sulphuric acid. I found out that the slightest detail between experiments could have made the biggest of differences to the overall result. I believe that the results I obtained were good enough to convince people of my prediction. * Other people can understand my results. * It was based on scientific knowledge. * It gave reproducible results. * I proved my prediction. * My method was straight forward and easy to understand. * My results gave a valid reason why the statue was corroding. Niall Bradley 12L Mr Finn ?? ?? ?? ?? 1/11 Niall Bradley 12L Mr Finn ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Classifying Materials section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Classifying Materials essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    In this CDA I will write about how plastic bags are made, why plastic ...

    out that even the 'weakest' plastic bag is still strong and would still carry a lot of groceries considering it is free. Many people who complain about how they are weak and how they may break, in some ways have no right to.

  2. The rates of reaction between CaCO3 and HCL

    East 100g 44g 5g 0.37 X20 x20 100g 7.4g 7.4 44 x 100 = 16.81818182% = 16.8% (1 dp) These calculations give a % purity so the higher the % the purer the limestone. Form the calculations and graph west is the purest as more CO2 was produced form the reactants.

  1. Investigating the Factors Affecting the Temperature Change Between Zinc and Copper Sulphate

    heat energy given out, but the copper sulphate solution will not reach the optimum temperature until 1.3g of zinc is added. The amount of zinc added to the copper sulphate will be related to the amount of heat energy given out.

  2. Our experiment consisted of two samples of water containing unknown substances, and our objective ...

    people and corrupt results, which is bad for validity of the experiment. Results Sample Flame colour Cation A Brick red Calcium B Intense yellow Sodium When we put sample A into the flame we initially thought that the colour was 'intense yellow'.

  1. Rate of reaction of hydrochloric acid on magnesium.

    + HCl (aq) MgCl2 (aq) + H2 (g) The variables and fair testing These are the variables that will influence the rate of the reaction, such as the following; * Concentration of hydrochloric acid, * Volume of hydrochloric acid,

  2. Affect of concentration on reaction

    This method is not ideal for an accurate investigation. I can solve these problems by grinding calcium carbonate chips into fine powder, so that the rate of reaction is increased greatly, easily be weighed accurately and the surface areas are uniformed.

  1. The Factors Affecting the Deflection of a Spaghetti Bridge

    Method Equipment I will use a ruler with millimeter and centimeter markings so that the deflection and length of spaghetti can be measured to the nearest millimeter; this should provide an appropriate level of accuracy to prove that the deflection is proportional to the mass applied.

  2. Redox reactions and the halogens.

    as the number of bonded pairs of electrons increases the bond angle increases. Also the less pairs of lone electrons there are the greater the bond angle. Covalent Giant Structures These are 3 dimensional networks of atoms bonded with covalent bonds. Carbon can form giant covalent structures, diamond and graphite.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work