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factors affecting the errosion of a magnesium statue

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In my garden I have a metal statue made mostly of magnesium. I have noticed that during the year it corrodes at different rates. In this assignment I want to find out why the statue in my garden made mostly of magnesium corrodes at different rates at different times of the year. This could be due a number of environmental conditions and changes that take place throughout the year. In this assignment I will demonstrate using my own knowledge why this occurs. In everyday life I am familiar with many chemical reactions that take place at different rates. There are many factors that affect rate of reaction, e.g.; temperature, surface area, concentration and catalysts, each in a different length of time and way. Temperature is a great effecter of chemical change. As the temperature of the atoms in a substance increase, they are able to move faster as energy is passed onto them through heat. At higher temperatures more collisions take place, when a collision occurs, there is more chance that the collision will lead to a reaction. The theory that we use to explain how different variables change the rate of reaction is called the collision theory. For a reaction to take place, the particles of the substances that are reacting have to collide. If they collide, with enough energy then they will react. The minimum amount of kinetic (movement) ...read more.

Middle

* Next I will measure out 50 cm� of sulphuric acid, using a measuring cylinder, and pour the sulphuric acid into a beaker. * Next I will take a 5cm magnesium strip, making sure the strip it is flat, and drop it in the all acid solution. As soon I drop the strip into the acid I will start the timer. * I will then stop the timer when the magnesium has completely dissolved and record the time in my table. * I will repeat this 4 more times but I dilute the acid with more water every time. * The second time there will be 40cm� of acid and 10cm� of water * The third time there will be 30cm� of acid and 20cm� of water, recording my results each time. * I will continue this until there is 40cm� of water and 10cm� of acid in the beaker. * I will conduct the experiment a second time to get the most accurate results I can. * I will wear an apron at all times. * I will wear goggles at all times. * Any acid spills that might happen, I will clean it up with a damp cloth. * Chairs and school bags will be tucked in under the table. Possible sources of error; * Magnesium strip not being placed flat on the surface of the acid. ...read more.

Conclusion

* More than 1 person is needed. * Plotting the points. I would have obtained a graph which looks like the following if I had used a gas syringe during the experiment: I also could have done more to improve the accuracy of this experiment; * Ensuring timings are accurate. * Measuring the volumes of water and sulphuric acid accurately (concentrations are correct). * Ensuring magnesium strip is placed in sulphuric acid flat. * Repeating experiment another 1 or 2 times. In my experiment I had to repeat a few results which did not fit with my other results. Results which did not fit my pattern could have been obtained because the magnesium strip was dirty or not flatly laid out and another was, there could have been temperature fluctuations, beakers were not rinsed out thoroughly or the timer could have been off time on insertion of the magnesium into the sulphuric acid. I found out that the slightest detail between experiments could have made the biggest of differences to the overall result. I believe that the results I obtained were good enough to convince people of my prediction. * Other people can understand my results. * It was based on scientific knowledge. * It gave reproducible results. * I proved my prediction. * My method was straight forward and easy to understand. * My results gave a valid reason why the statue was corroding. Niall Bradley 12L Mr Finn ?? ?? ?? ?? 1/11 Niall Bradley 12L Mr Finn ...read more.

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