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Finding How Much Acid There is in a Solution.

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Introduction

Finding How Much Acid There is in a Solution Planning Assessment I am going to conduct an experiment to find the amount of acid in a solution using the titration technique. I have been told that the acid is in between 0.05 and 0.15 mol dm-3, so I will find the concentration by neutralising a 0.10 mol dm-3 concentrated solution of sodium carbonate. Equipment: - Burette - Pipette (25 cm3) - Clamp Stand - Conical Flask (250 cm3) - Measuring Cylinder - Sulphuric Acid Solution (between 0.05 and 0.15 mol dm-3) - Solid Anhydrous Sodium Carbonate - Phenolphthalein Indicator Solution - Distilled Water - Access to a Balance - Beaker (250 cm3) - Funnel - Small Container - White Tile Method: First you must make up a Sodium Carbonate Solution. To do this you weigh out 2.65g of the anhydrous sodium carbonate. You transfer the sodium carbonate to a 250 cm3 beaker, washing out the container you weighed it in with distilled water, and tipping the water into the 250 cm3 beaker also. ...read more.

Middle

Place the conical flask on top of the white tile underneath the Burette. The white tile makes it easier to notice the change in colour. Now the experiment is ready to be started. To titrate, you must shake the conical flask (to mix the solution evenly), whilst adding the acid slowly to the solution. The first time this is done will be a rough titre, to see roughly where you need to slow the addition of the acid. You should simply add the acid to the solution until it turns colourless. For the next titres however, you must be more careful, as you must try and find the last drop which turns the solution colourless. You should aim for 5 titres, however, it is important to try and get 3 titres within 0.1 of each other. This shows that you have successful results. If you do not have 3 titres within 0.1 of each other then you must continue to do further titres until you have 3 successful titres. ...read more.

Conclusion

This means it has a percentage error of 0.1% -The volumetric flask also has a percentage error. This is 0.2 cm3 and it's reading was 250 cm3. This calculates to a percentage error of 0.08%. This means that the Pipette was the item of equipment which contributed most to the error in the experiment, whereas the Burette was the next highest contributor, and the flask barely affected the accuracy at all. Evaluating Evidence: The average titre (the most consistent result) was 14.20 cm3. This means that it takes 14.20 cm3 of The Sulphuric acid solution to exactly neutralise 25.00 cm3 of 0.10 molar Sodium Carbonate solution. 1 mol of Sodium Carbonate will neutralise 1 mol of Sulphuric acid. One dm3 (1000 cm3)of sodium carbonate contains 1 mol. Therefore, 25.00 cm3 Sodium Carbonate solution contains: (25 x 0.1) = 0.0025 mols. 1000 If 0.0025 molar Sodium Carbonate solution neutralises 0.0025 molar Sulphuric Acid then 14.20 cm3 of Sulphuric acid contains 0.0025 mols. 1 cm3 of Sulphuric Acid contains (0.0025) = 0.0000176 x 1000 = 0.18 mols of Sulphuric Acid. 14.20 Therefore the solution of Sulphuric Acid was a 0.18 molar solution ...read more.

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