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For a sand dune ecosystem you have studied, describe and explain the structure and functioning of the system. Describe how human activity has impacted on the ecosystem and evaluate attempts to manage the system.

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Introduction

For a sand dune ecosystem you have studied, describe and explain the structure and functioning of the system. Describe how human activity has impacted on the ecosystem and evaluate attempts to manage the system. The sand dunes at Oxwich bay started to develop around 500BC due to the large amount of sand be deposited. The first due to form was the embryonic dunes as exposed sand accumulated around obstacles and the pioneer species established there. The main pioneer species is sea couch grass as it is xerophytes at can adapt to new conditions such as short immersion in water. ...read more.

Middle

Yellow dunes are difficult to adapt to as that sand is a poor heat conductor and any rain is quickly absorbed by plants as well has washing salt out of the sand. This community is dominated by Marram grass as it I suited to these conditions. The next dune to form are the fixed grey dunes these are more stable as they are situated further inland. The hummus content of the soil has built up and can support a greater range of species, such as heather, bracken and bramble. The dune is now reached a state of dynamic equilibrium and is called a climax community. ...read more.

Conclusion

One of the main problems associated with visitors is trampling as this removes protective vegetation and can lead to the formation of blowouts. To stop trampling they have used signposts to educate people and controlling visitor walkways by using fences to restrict areas. These methods are very successful as they reduce the amount of trampling and stop blowouts occurring. Overgrazing is also a problem concerned with the management of sand dunes as it can produce an open, lichen dominated community. Other problems are afforestation, which was designed to prevent major movements of the mobile san. However this has resulted in a loss of character of the vegetation in planted areas to solve this they have introduced specie diversity and removed scrub and invasive foreign species. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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