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Force, mass and acceleration

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Introduction

Force, mass and acceleration 1. What happens to a moving object if the forces on it are balanced? You said: It keeps moving. 2. What happens to a moving object if the forces on it are unbalanced? You said: It speeds up in the direction of the unbalanced force. 3. What is the unit of force? You said: The Newton (N) ...read more.

Middle

You said: 8N Friction and non-uniform motion 1. In which direction does friction act? You said: In the opposite direction to the direction of movement. 2. Which force causes objects to fall? You said: Gravity 3. What can we say about the forces acting on an object at terminal velocity? You said: They are balanced. 4. Which of the following can increase the thinking distance for a moving car? ...read more.

Conclusion

Which line on the graph below represents the greatest speed? You said: A 4. What does a horizontal line on a velocity-time graph represent? You said: Constant velocity 5. Which line on the graph below represents the greatest acceleration? You said: A 6. A car accelerates from rest to 30m/s in 15s. What is its acceleration? You said: 2m/s2 7. What does the gradient on a distance-time graph represent? You said: Speed 8. What does the gradient on a velocity-time graph represent? You said: Acceleration 9. What does the area under a velocity-time graph represent? You said: Distance travelled ...read more.

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