• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

GCSE Bioligy Case Sudy - MRSA

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Is going to hospital too much of a risk due to the outbreak of MRSA? Contents Page * Introduction 1 * What is MRSA? 2 * How does MRSA reproduce? 2 * Why is MRSA resistatant to most antibiotics? 3 * How do antibiotics work? 3 * How can MRSA be prevented? 3 * How does MRSA harm someone? 4 * What are the symptoms of MRSA? 4 * MRSA in hospitals 5 * Arguments against going to hospital 5 * Arguments In favour of going to hospital 5 * Evaluation of the evidence 6 * Conclusion 6 * Alternative Conclusion 6 * Bibliography 7 Introduction In this case study I will look into the scientific and ethical implications of MRSA in hospitals. I will try to decide whether or not going to hospital is to much of a risk due to the outbreak of MRSA, whilst also explaining the science behind MRSA and the current situations we are facing with it in our day to day lives. Hopefully this article will widen your understanding and views on this controversial subject. Left: MRSA under the microscope (1) What is MRSA? MRSA (the abbreviation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, often refered to as a "superbug" due to its restance to most antibiotics) ...read more.

Middle

When enough of the MRSA bacteria are desroyed, the immune system is able to recover and destroy the remaining few. However, antibiotics do not destoy viruses because viruses are not live bacteria. They carry DNA, which is injected into a living cell and uses that cell as a "host" to reproduce more of the infective viruses. (13) How can we prevent MRSA? As I explained on page 2, only a few antibiotics can kill MRSA, and the rate of mutation of MRSA is so high that immune strains of the bacteria are formed. This causes the current antibiotic to be rendered "useless" and there is a requirement for new antibiotics that can destroy the MRSA. Another method of prevention is through good personal hygeine. Some general tips are; Try not to share personal items like towels or razors, as this will increase the chance of spreading MRSA. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to destroy the bacteria. Cover cuts and scrapes with a clean bandage. This will help the wound heal, as well as preventing you from spreading bacteria to other people. Try not to touch other people's wounds or bandages. If you use any shared equipment, sanitize it before and after you use it. ...read more.

Conclusion

2. Recent evidence shows a recent reduction in MRSA cases, as from 2007 to 2008 (14). The number of death certificates in England and Wales which mentioned Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in them decreased by 37% in 2009 to 781 from 1,230 in 2008. This 37% decrease is probibly due to raised awareness in general hygeine. This means it is becoming less common, and therefore there is a even lower risk of conceding MRSA at a hospital. 3. "There were 836 cases of MRSA infections in April to June of 2008, a 36% drop on the same period in 2007, and a 57% reduction since April to June 2004" - The Health Protection Agency. This evidence improves people's generall confidence in hospitals, decreasing the dangers on to benefits dangers ratio. Evaluation of the evidence My evaluation of this Conclusion After evaluating the evidence and refering to the original question "Is going to hospital too much of a risk due to the outbreak of MRSA?" I conclude that hospitals are not too much of a risk despite the outbreak of MRSA. This is because in the evidence section, the benefits of hospitals continuously outweighed the dangers of MRSA. There are only about 1 in 1000 preventable deaths in hospitals are caused by MRSA, concluding that about 99.9% of preventable deaths in hospitals are not caused by MRSA. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Life Processes & Cells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

An excellent GCSE level report that presents key scientific explanations and arguments clearly, with good use of relevant graphs and statistics and consistent references. To improve:
1)Clarify why the diseases that MRSA cause are so dangerous, briefly describing what they are. For example meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in the brain
2)Name some of the alternative antibiotics that can be used to treat MRSA
3)Work on scientific language. Bacteria are never immune to anything. They are resistant

Marked by teacher Kerry jackson 15/02/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Life Processes & Cells essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Plan: The effect of the end product, phosphate, on the enzyme phosphatase

    5 star(s)

    which produces phenolphthalein and phosphate when reacts with phosphotase in a buffer solution. The reaction was carried out in 5 test tubes with different concentrations of sodium phosphate added to the buffer in each beaker and incubated in the same water bath for 20 minutes.

  2. The Nervous System

    ? Relay neurons: Transmit never impulses from the sensory neurons to the motor neurons. ? Motor neurons: carry impulses from the CNS to the effectors. The nerve fibres do not carry sensations like pain. These sensations are only felt when the impulse reaches the brain.

  1. The effect of acid on the cell membrane

    Preliminary Experiment In my preliminary experiment I cut up 1.5cm3 squares of cabbage and washed these to ensure any pigment that had leaked during chopping was not included in my results. I then put multiple pieces of cabbage in the boiling tubes to average out any thicknesses in cabbage layers.

  2. B3 Discovery of DNA

    and using a combination of crystallographic theory and chemical reasoning, she discovered important facts about DNA structure (15). b) James Watson and Francis Crick used x-ray crystallography data, produced by Franklin, to decipher DNA's structure (16).

  1. Research Project - Comparing Antiseptics, Antibiotics and Disinfectants

    Savlon Antiseptic Liquid may also be used in bathing or midwifery to help cleanse the skin. http://www.lloydspharmacy.com/en/savlon-antiseptic-liquid-500ml-11287 The purified water is one of the ingredients, it?s passed through a filtration membrane, and the water is cleared of particles and microbes. An ion exchanger removes unwanted dissolved solids such as metals.

  2. Structures and functions in living organisms. Revision Notes

    2.8 Understand the role of enzymes as biological catalysts in metabolic reactions Metabolic Reaction - The chemical reactions that cause the life processes of organisms to occur Biological Catalyst - A catalyst that speeds up metabolic reactions * Enzymes help cells carry out all the life processes quickly.

  1. Compare and Contrast, Eukaryote and Prokaryote Cells

    It is thought that eukaryotic cells emerged from an endosymbiotic relationship between the ancestors of modern day eukaryotic cells and cyanobacteria, in order to be able to provide their own energy, due to the increased size of the eukaryotic cells.

  2. James Watson and Francis Cricks Discovery of DNA

    Research and findings Franklin first began her career working for a coal company where she invented the high strength carbon fibres that would be later used as graphite rods in nuclear power plants. In her later experiments she was able to prove that the B form of DNA was a

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work