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GCSE Chemistry - Electrolysis Coursework

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

��ࡱ�>�� KM����J�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5@ ��0�.bjbj�2�2 (b�X�X!$�������������������8� ����v��������tvvvvvv$kR���������������BBB�����tB�tBBT��T�� ���QO����dTt�0�T� � T������� �T ��B�������2GCSE Chemistry - Electrolysis Coursework AIMS It is known that by passing a constant electric current through an aqueous copper sulphate solution that the passage of ions through this solution results in copper atoms being dissolved into the solution from the anode while positive copper ions (cations) being discharged at the cathode. Normally anions are discharged at the anode. The experiment carried out aimed to monitor the quantity of Copper (Cu) metal deposited during the electrolysis of Copper Sulphate solution (CuSo4) using Copper electrodes, when certain variables were changed. It was considered that the following factors could affect the deposition of Copper metal on the cathode. 1. Time 2. Current 3. Temperature 4. Molarity/Concentration of Solution 5. Quantity of Solution 6. Size of Electrodes 7. Distance between the electrodes 8. The surface of the electrodes The time was chosen because it is an easy quantity to measure and record, whilst at the same time maintaining the other variables at a constant level. The other factors could be observed in later experiments, should time allow. PREDICTIONS It is possible to predict that the relationship will be directly proportional between the time the current flows and the mass of Copper deposited on the Cathode (negative electrode). ...read more.

Middle

The electrodes were weighed, their masses recorded and placed into the beaker containing Copper Sulphate solution. The electrodes were connected to a cell and ammeter. A steady current flowed (0.2 Amps) and the experiment was stopped at definite times (i.e. 5,10,15,20,25 minutes). At these times the current was switched off and both electrodes were removed from the solution. They were then washed by dipping in distilled water, and dried by dipping into propanone (a highly volatile liquid which readily evaporates) and placed near an electric heater. Once clean and dry both electrodes were both carefully weighed and their subsequent masses recorded. RESULTS ANODE (+) TIME (MINUTES) ORIGINAL MASS OF ANODE (grams) FINAL MASS OF ANODE (grams) CHANGE IN MASS AT ANODE (grams) 5 12.491g 12.468g -0.023g 10 11.834g 11.792g -0.042g 15 12.528g 12.459g -0.069g 20 12.444g 12.365g -0.080g 25 11.098g 11.002g -0.096g CATHODE (-) TIME (MINUTES) ORIGINAL MASS OF CATHODE (grams) FINAL MASS OF CATHODE (grams) CHANGE IN MASS AT CATHODE (grams) 5 11.824g 11.848g +0.024g 10 12.456g 12.485g +0.039g 15 12.942g 13.011g +0.069g 20 12.967g 13.050g +0.082g 25 13.872g 13.983g +0.111g AVERAGE TIME (MINUTES) AVERAGE CHANGE IN MASS (grams) 5 0.0235g 10 0.0405g 15 0.0690g 20 0.0810g 25 0.104g THEORETICAL RESULTS TIME (MINUTES) THEORETICAL CHANGE IN MASS (grams) 5 0.0199g 10 0.0398g 15 0.0597g 20 0.0796g 25 0.0995g CONCLUSION The results obtained support the prediction that the longer the current is left to flow, the more Copper metal is deposited on the cathode. ...read more.

Conclusion

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