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GCSE photosynthesis coursework

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Introduction

GCSE Biology Photosynthesis Coursework Jasem Alanizy Contents Page Introduction....................................................................Page 1 Aim and hypothesis.........................................................Page 2 Light intensity..................................................................Page 3 Carbon dioxide concentration..........................................Page 4 Continued result and evaluation.......................................Page 5 Effect of Chlorophyll.........................................................Page 6 Continued result and Evaluation.......................................Page 7 The Effect of temperature aim and apparatus....................Page 8 Safety and prediction.......................................................Page 9 Results............................................................................Page 10 Analysis...........................................................................Page 11 Conclusion and Variables.................................................Page 12 Method...........................................................................Page 13 Evaluation and Bibliography.............................................Page 14 Introduction Photosynthesis is the combination of sugar from light, carbon dioxide and water with oxygen being a waste product. This process is possibly the most important biochemical path known. Nearly everything in our everyday lives depends on this process, we would not be alive right now if it weren't for this cycle, this is due to the fact that us humans breath in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide, with plants it is the opposite; they take in carbon dioxide and take out oxygen, which we breathe in making it extremely important for us to have plants in order to respire. The process of photosynthesis is a very complex process. Here is a picture of an ordinary leaf. The leaf plays a major part in the process of photosynthesis, as it takes in the light which is later on made to glucose Photosynthesis uses the energy of light to make glucose which keeps the plant alive. ...read more.

Middle

While the non-green region gives a negative result to the iodine test. This experiment has proved to us that chlorophyll does affect the rate of photosynthesis. 4. The effect of temperature This is my main chosen point of interest throughout the coursework. Aim Our main aim is to find out whether temperature affects the rate of photosynthesis in a Canadian pondweed (this is a picture of Canadian pondweed). Apparatus To undergo the experiment we needed the following items and apparatus: 1. Sprigs of pondweed 2. Boiling tubes filled with water 3. Lamp 4. Thermometer 5. Ice 6. Supply of constant hot water 7. Tissues 8. Ruler 9. Beaker 10. Bubble counter 11. Scissors 12. Tweezers 13. Timer Safety Although this experiment may seem harmless we must take full precautions at all times to avoid any injury possible, below are some things we should bare in mind whilst performing the experiment to avoid serious damage or injury: * Hot water can cause serious injury therefore we must be very wary and attentive to where we pour it. * Scissors can also cause injury hence we should only stick to the task of cutting the pond weed not your partner's hair. ...read more.

Conclusion

After a period of five minutes we stopped counting the bubbles, the results are available in the results section of the coursework. Here is a diagram of the experiment.. Evaluation I believe the experiment went well just as planned and worked out very well. I am confident about this because the results I got where the pretty much the same as the professional scientific results. I also believe that my results where accurate enough to prove that my prediction was correct. As I predicted that 30°C would be the most suitable temperature for photosynthesis to take place. We can see that this prediction is correct by looking at the graph. The method I used in order to carry out the experiment in my opinion was as fair as possible. I changed the pondweed every time in order to get a fair result, I also used the same volume of water each time to make sure that it does not effect the rate of bubbles released. If I had the opportunity to repeat the experiment I would try to measure the rate of photosynthesis at more temperatures, this would give me a clearer result and will indicate to me perfectly which temperature is most suitable for the most amount of bubbles given of from the Elodea. ...read more.

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