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Global Warming on Earth Physics Project

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Introduction

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Global warming is the gradual increase in the average temperature of Earth’s air, or more accurately the lowest part of the troposphere (the layer of the atmosphere that has contact with the surface of Earth). Recently this has been increasing at a faster and faster rate. The average global temperature has increased by 0.74°C over the past century, and most of this increase has happened during the past couple of centuries. Below is a graph of the Average Global Temperature measured each year. The values jump up and down rapidly, this is due to various Earthly Cycles, but the general increases and decreases can be seen. Up until about 50 years ago there were times where the temperature increased but then there was ‘global cooling’ (the opposite of global warming) where the Earth recovered so that the general temperature stayed roughly the same over a long period of time. Since 1950, this has not happened nearly as much, with just a

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Middle

       Below shows a graph on how worrying our situation is already. The graph shows the increase and decrease of average temperature over the past two millennia, the main point is that until recently, all the global ‘warmings’ have evened themselves out, but all these increases in temperature have not been nearly as massive as that over the past century. There is only so much that Earth can ‘heal’ itself.

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First, to tackle this problem we need to understand what actually causes global warming before we can actually tackle it. Because to tackle the problem, we need to tackle the causes.

       The reason that the global temperature fluctuates so much is that the Earth goes through natural, internal processes such and external factors. These are due to solar activity, changes in the Earth’s orbit and things such as volcanic emissions. These activites bring the temperature up for a while before it goes back down. The irreversible change comes from greenhouse gas emmisions.

       Greenhouse gases are substances that cause the ‘Greenhouse Effect’.

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Conclusion

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       This picture shows what a nuclear power plant looks like. Even this produces emissions but for the amount of energy it produces, it is very small. Also, there have been plans proposed for the ‘watering down’ of the emissions so that the gases do not escape into the atmosphere but form diluted acids.

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