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Heart Transplant Essay

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Introduction

Biology Nikita One World Essay: Heart Transplant In this essay I am going to discuss the following; Who is in need of a heart transplant the most; George, Mary or John, and why? The benefits and limitations of an organ transplant The benefits of an organ transplant are that the patients will, if you have a valve failure, like John, the chances are that after a valve surgery, that a few years later you're other valves will have the same problem. And then giving the patient (in this case John) a new donor heart will prevent these problems occurring. A donor heart transplant will prevent (if the patient has had a good surgery with no problems, and the heart doesn't decide to fail after a few years) that the patient does not have to return to the hospital for more surgeries, since everything that was wrong with the patient's heart is not there anymore. The limitations of a donor heart transplant are that the patients might suffer from other circulatory conditions unrelated to the heart. These conditions might cause (usually do) problems or complications while the patient is in heart surgery. ...read more.

Middle

to keep the patient living. The availability of enough organ donors In the world today, there is an organ donor shortage. This is having a severe impact on society, because there are many people capable of being a donor, but don't want to be because of religious reasons. Slowly though, the religions of the world are fading, and more people 'sign up' for organ donator. Also, Governments are trying to make donation of organs after death legal. Who pays for the heart transplant? Usually your insurance pays for the patient's heart transplant, which varies in the price range from � 50,000 to � 287,000. It is very important that you make sure, before having a heart transplant, that your insurance covers it. Otherwise you have to pay it in cash, and for many people that is a problem. Does the patient need a donor council? The ethical issues surrounding donor organs These are a few ethical questions asked when looking for an organ donor: * Is the body a commodity? * Can it be bought? * How should decisions be made on distributing scarce organs? * When several healthy organs are available, should they all go to one person or should several needy people each receive just one? ...read more.

Conclusion

Who do I think is the most capable of having this heart? I think the most capable person of having this heart is Mary. The reason I believe this is because: John: * Is very old * Can have valve replacements instead * Doesn't qualify for point 1. of the limitations of an organ transplant where it stated that you have to be younger than 65. George: * Has a very bad drinking and smoking habit * Doesn't qualify for point 7. of the limitations of an organ transplant where is stated that the patient must not have smoked or used alcohol for at least 3 months before being put on the transplant waiting list, and you must be trusted not to smoke or drink afterward. * He could live off bypasses until he agrees to quit his terrible habits. Mary might have a few problems, concerning that she doesn't have a donor council, but this is not necessary for heart transplantation. She has inherited her heart disease, which gives her no other option but to have heart transplantation. Also, Mary might have a 50% chance that her children are infected by the same heart disease as she has, but she still has the other 50% that this will not occur. This is why I believe that Mary should have this heart. ...read more.

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