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Heat loss

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Introduction

To investigate how the three types of heat transfers affects heat loss and ways to stop this from happening and applying this to a model house.

Plan

My partner and I chose to investigate convection, whilst the rest of the group were to investigate either radiation or conduction.

For convection particularly, I took two identical beakers. I then took a piece of card and cur out a circle which fit on the beaker. I cut a small circle in the centre to fit a thermometer in. Before putting a lid on top, my partner and I poured 200ml of hot water from a kettle in the two beakers (I measured at eye-level for accuracy); one with the lid and the one without which was acting as a control.

We were then ready to begin the experiment. We took a stop watch and timed up to five minutes, recording the temperature after every one minute. We then repeated the experiment once more to make our results reliable. After doing all that, we did a separate experiment, using two different materials as lids. This was in order to see if different materials are better at reducing heat than others.

In order to make this a fair test, we had to have constants and only one variable.

...read more.

Middle

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Conduction

Conduction is the final heat transfer in which a substance transfers heat energy to another substance by direct contact of atoms or molecules.

I predict that having a sponge or foam around the beaker will prevent conduction. Reasons for this are that, a sponge or foam contains trapped air. This means that it cannot escape. Air is known to be a very poor conductor of heat. This prevents conduction and so reduces the amount of heat loss.

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The number of observations I will take will be five as I will be recording the temperature after every one minute up to five minutes.

Results        

Time

Temperature for beaker with lid (in degrees Celsius)

Temperature for beaker without lid   ---   Control

1

83

82

2

78

75

3

76

73

4

75

71

5

72

69

Here are the first set of results for convection:

Here is our repeated ones:

Time

Temperature for beaker with lid (in degrees Celsius)

Temperature for beaker without lid   ---   Control

1

71

68

2

69

66

3

67

65

4

66

64

5

65

63

 Average:

Time

Temperature for beaker with lid (in degrees Celsius)

Temperature for beaker without lid   ---   Control

1

77

75

2

73.5

70.5

3

71.5

69

4

70.5

67.5

5

68.5

66

...read more.

Conclusion

I think that the evidence is sufficient for a firm conclusion and that insulating, having a lid on top of and having a shiny surface does affect the heat transfers in that in all three areas, heat loss is reduced. I know this as this is what my graph and not only have my results showed me. Maybe having a lid, insulation or having a shiny surface doesn’t entirely stop heat loss, but at least it reduces it bit by bit.

A way to extend my enquiry would be either to continue with seeing which material is best at reducing and preventing convection or to do another experiment in which there are two beakers; one used as a control and the other one which has all three methods at preventing all three heat transfers; aluminium foil, insulation and a lid.

This way we could see how that affects the heat loss and if some materials are better at doing their job than others.

...read more.

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