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How are leaves adapted to control water Loss?

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Introduction

Biology Practical Assessment How are leaves adapted to control water Loss? Leaves are made up of several different layers of cells, which are very complex. They all have different functions. Leaves differ from one plant to another. Some may be very large, while some may be small. There could also be a difference in texture, colour and shape. Some leaves may also appear more turgid, while others appear flaccid. Veins on a leaf may differ, some veins may be thick, and others may be thin. Finally width and thickness may change from one leaf to another. A leaf looses water from the Stomata. This process is called Transpiration. To counter act this water loss plants must absorb water from the surrounding soil via its roots. Water enters the root as well as salts/minerals in a process call osmosis. ...read more.

Middle

for one day, I believe I will also find that the smaller leaves will loose the least amount of water/weight, I believe this as in general larger leaves have more stomata to loose water from there fore in a smaller leaf there will be less stomata's to loose water from. Leaf 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st weighing 2nd weighing Difference in weight loss % of weight loss Amount of water loss in cm Leaf 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st weighing 2nd weighing Difference in weight loss % of weight loss Amount of water loss in cm Leaf 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st weighing 2nd weighing Difference in weight loss % of weight loss Amount of water loss in cm Leaf 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st weighing 2nd weighing Difference in weight loss % of weight loss Amount of water loss in cm Leaf 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1st weighing 2nd weighing Difference in weight loss % of weight loss Amount of water loss in cm Conclusion. ...read more.

Conclusion

leaves are less well adapted to cope with water loss, and small leaves are better able to cope with water loss as generally the stomata count is lesser than the count of the larger leaves. This is so because on a larger leaf there is more surface area to contain the stomata's. Evaluation. To evaluate I can say that my results were as I expected. I think the experiment went more or less as we planned and were pleased with the results achieved. I have to say that some results in the tables were a bit wild, although this could be put down to chance, or inaccurate weighing methods. I believe that the weight of the leaf may not have been the best variable to base the investigation around, so am glad of the choice to investigate the size of leaf. Over all I am pleased with the way I carried out this investigation, and with the results achieved. ...read more.

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