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How does changing the concentration of hydrochloric acid effect the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon ?

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Introduction

How does changing the concentration of hydrochloric acid effect the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon ? I plan to investigate the effect the concentration of acid has in the reaction between dilute hydrochloric acid and magnesium ribbon. I will measure the rate of the chemical reaction between the hydrochloric acid and the magnesium ribbon. The rate of a chemical reaction is a measure of how fast the reaction takes place. When a reaction takes place the outer-shell of the atom will loose or gain an electron to become stable in doing this the outer shell we become full or in some case electrons can be shared to make the atoms stable. Some reactions happen rapidly this means the reaction is completed in a short period of time other reaction happen slowly and are completed in a longer period of time. Some reactions are very fast, for example: - The reaction time of potassium (k) in hydrochloric acid is very rapid where as the reaction time of potassium (k) in water is still fast but a lot slower than in hydrochloric acid. In this investigation I will test different concentrations of hydrochloric acid reacting with magnesium. To do this I am going to have to set up my equipment to perform the experiment. I will first of all fill a bowl and a 100cm cubed measuring cylinder with water. I will tip this measuring cylinder upside down in the bowl of water so that it does not loose any of the water. ...read more.

Middle

Graph here Experiment 1 Time (sec) 0.2 Molar 0.5 Molar 1.0 Molar 1.5 Molar 2.0 Molar 10 0 3 10 18 40 20 1 3 21 30 44 30 1 5 30 34 44 40 1 8 38 41 45 50 2 9 40 43 45 60 2 10 42 44 70 2 11 43 80 3 13 44 90 3 14 100 3 15 110 3 16 120 4 18 130 4 19 140 5 20 150 5 21 160 5 22 170 5 23 180 5 25 190 6 26 200 6 28 210 6 29 220 6 30 230 6 31 240 6 32 Experiment 2 Time (sec) 0.2 Molar 0.5 Molar 1.0 Molar 1.5 Molar 2.0 Molar 10 0 2 12 19 32 20 0 3 20 29 41 30 1 4 30 41 42 40 1 5 37 42 42 50 1 6 41 43 42 60 1 6 44 45 70 2 10 45 80 2 11 45 90 2 13 45 100 3 15 110 3 17 120 3 18 130 4 19 140 4 20 150 5 21 160 5 22 170 5 24 180 5 25 190 5 26 200 6 27 210 6 28 220 6 30 230 6 31 240 6 31 Experiment 3 Time (sec) 0.2 Molar 0.5 Molar 1.0 Molar 1.5 Molar 2.0 Molar 10 0 2 10 18 32 20 1 3 21 30 41 30 1 5 30 34 42 40 1 8 37 42 42 50 2 9 39 43 ...read more.

Conclusion

Magnesium oxide - Magnesium oxide was a problem in the experiment I had to remove the magnesium oxide use emery paper it was very hard to see if I had removed all of the magnesium oxide from every piece of magnesium. Weight of magnesium - In my experiment I did not weigh the magnesium instead I measured it by length. If I had weighed it I would be able to make the sure the mass of the magnesium was the same each time so there were the same number of magnesium atoms for the number of collisions with the hydrochloric acid. My results are correct, I know this because my results support my prediction which I based on known scientific knowledge. I have studied my results to try and find any anomalies that would affect my averages but I have not found any this indicates the good accuracy of my experiments. My evidence is reliable enough to support a firm conclusion, this is because I performed three repeats for each condition all which come out with similar results and no anomalies as well as this my prediction was accurate. As well as this the results coincide with other experiments, which have been performed by professional scientists. I could perform additional experiments changing different factors I could use different acids and different alkaline metals, I could also use different concentrations of acid. I could perform the experiments at different temperatures. I could also perform more repeats of the experiment I have already been doing. Gary Lester 11 G ...read more.

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