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How Does Exercise Effect The Body?

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Introduction

Amandeep Gill GCSE Coursework How Does Exercise Effect The Body? Aim : My aim is to find out how exercise effects the body, particularly looking how your heart rate changes from a stationary position to the after effects of the activity of my choice. The exercises I have chosen to carryout are sprinting, jogging, walking and performing star jumps. Word Equation Formula for Respiration, Glucose + Oxygen Carbon Dioxide + Water + Energy Symbol Equation Formula for Respiration, C6 H12 O6 + 6O2 6CO2 + 6H20 + Energy I will be using the formula for respiration in the latter stages of my experiment and showing how it is related to exercise? Equipment Used, The following is a list of the equipment I will be using for my practical experiment: Stop Clock - Used to time various stages of the experiment, e.g. 30 seconds for stationary pulse. Tape Measurer - Used to measure the twenty- five metre strip used in the majority of the exercises. Pen and Paper - Used to record the results whilst the activities are taking place. Pair of Trainers - Used instead of school shoes, as they can often be painful when running in and this could effect the pace in which the experiment is carried out at. Towel - Used after the practical experiment has taken place. Diagrams of the Equipment, Prediction, From previous scientific knowledge, I predict that when doing exercise, the body's temperature, breathing rate and the heart rate will all increase. ...read more.

Middle

146 + 144 + 142 = 432 Bpm Average Heart Rate after Jogging - 432 / 3 = 144 A.J.R 144 - 69.50 A.S.R = 74.50 Bpm This means there has been a 74.50 Bpm rise in Heart rate after Stationary. Sprinting, As you can see from my results the difference between jogging and sprinting is almost double the no. of Bpm. This is due to the vigorous pace of sprinting. 276 + 272 + 272 = 820 Bpm Average Heart Rate after Sprinting - 820 / 3 = 273.33 A.SP.R 273.33 - 69.50 A.S.R = 203.83 Bpm This means there has been a 203.83 Bpm rise in Heart Rate after Stationary. Star Jumps, As you see from my results my heart rate is in between the amount of Bpm of Sprinting and Jogging. This is because the pace in which star jumps are performed is larger than jogging but less than sprinting. 156 + 158 + 160 = 474 Bpm Average Heart Rate after Star Jumps - 474 / 3 = 158 A.SJ.R 158 - 69.50 A.S.R = 88.50 Bpm This means there is an 88.50 Bpm rise in Heart Rate after Stationary. My Final Table Of Results Exercise Activity Mean Average (in Bpm) Stationary Average Rise in Heart Rate (in Bpm) Walking 71.67 69.50 2.17 Jogging 144 69.50 74.50 Sprinting 273.33 69.50 203.83 Star Jumps 158 69.50 88.50 Analysis, Word Equation Formula for Respiration, Glucose + Oxygen Carbon Dioxide + Water + Energy Symbol ...read more.

Conclusion

As the speedometer can help you gain a much more sustainable level of speed rather than the unbalanced pace of sprinting which attracts fatigue. There aren't any experiments I would like to do again because the results taken were fine the first time. What I would have liked to do is compare them with someone of a higher or lower fitness level than myself to see the difference. I feel my results have covered a large range of results and are enough to come to a solid conclusion about my prediction. I think that maybe more activities would be better. I will admit, my results can be influenced/ affected be different factors such as the temperature outside. Also, the state of the weather could have proved to be a problem, e.g. in the case of rain, which may cause a hazard on a slippery surface. This was obviously slightly different on each day of the experiment, but in the end did not affect the outcome. The results I got must have been quite precise as I got very similar results after the three days. I used a mixture of judging with the eye and scientific instruments. The instruments that I used throughout the experiment are reliable and have been used effectively before in other previous experiments. I think that these results will be good enough to support the hypotheses and answers made and corrected in the analysis. They have been consistent throughout, and this must be amended to thoughtful planning, and a careful and well-planned practical experimentation on my part. ...read more.

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