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How does height influence velocity.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Daniel Rollé

Physics Coursework

How does height influence velocity

Rationale: When an object is at the top of a slope its position above the ground provides it with gravitational potential energy. As it moves down the slope, the object loses potential energy but as energy cannot be destroyed, it is converted into kinetic energy. Assuming that the system is 100% efficient all of the potential energy will be converted into kinetic energy at the bottom of the slope. We can use this information to predict the speed at which the object should move when it reaches the bottom of the slope.

Aim: To investigate how the velocity of an object changes when the height of the ramp it moves down is changed.

Introduction: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, it exists in many forms all around us, and we cannot sense it or feel it- it is just there. Potential energy, gravitational potential energy, elastic energy, chemical energy, nuclear energy, kinetic energy, thermal energy, electrical energy and radiant energy are examples of them.

Friction is one the most important forces that we use in everyday life. Without it we would not be able to walk or even move about. Cars would not work and you would not be able to write.  Before the time of Galileo and Newton, people thought there was only one force, called a driving force. Newton discovered that there were unseen forces like friction and air resistance all around us, helping us do everything.

...read more.

Middle

1.68

1.69

1.75

1.90

1.93

1.67

1.81

1.87

1.99

Height of ramp-25cm

Test

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Result

(cm)

1.02

1.01

1,05

1.07

1.09

0.97

1.11

1.04

1.02

0.99

Height of ramp-35cm

Test

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Result

(cm)

0.98

0.86

0.95

0.94

0.94

0.89

0.93

1.00

0.90

0.94

Height of ramp-50cm

Test

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Result

(cm)

0.79

0.94

0.93

0.94

1.00

0.91

0.91

0.95

0.88

0.96

Height of ramp-60cm

Test

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Result

(cm)

0.94

0.85

0.93

0.87

0.89

0.99

0.95

0.94

0.96

0.97

Height

Av. time

Distance

Av. Speed

  2GH

0.10m

1.85s

2m

1.08m/s

1.4 m/s

0.25m

1.10s

2m

2.81m/s

2.21 m/s

0.35m

0.94s

2m

2.10m/s

2.26 m/s

0.50m

0.92s

2m

2.20m/s

3.15 m/s

0.60m

0.74s

2m

2.27m/s

3.42 m/s

The following calculations show how we found each figure in the table above:

Calculations for average time:

...read more.

Conclusion

There are other experiments that we could test the hypothesis on. One experiment is the Ball and Ruler experiment.   This experiment could show how air resistance affects an object falling through the air.  

Apparatus

  • A set of ten metre rulers
  • A tennis ball
  • A Stopwatch

Diagram

Method

The apparatus is set up. Ten heights are decided in advance, to obtain a wide range of results.

 Then one person takes the tennis ball and drops it from the first height. This is recorded from the time the person drops the ball, to the time it hits the ground.  The result is recorded and then this exercise is done a further nine times.  Once all ten results have been recorded on the first height, the height is changed, and the experiment is carried out ten times.  

When all the results are gathered, they should show how different heights have a different rate of air resistance. This experiment could be used to back up the first experiment and reiterated the results, as well as show their accuracy.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

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