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How does the concentration of acid affect the neutralisation point.

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How does the concentration of acid affect the neutralisation point Aim to find how the concentration of acid affects the neutralisation point between acid and alkali. Preliminary work in my preliminary work my aim was to find out which indicator would give the best results in my neutralisation experiment to do this we used three different indicators and worked out which one gave us the result closest to the neutralisation point. We found that universal indicator gave us the most varied results and was the closest to the neutralisation point. ...read more.


The strength of the alkali. This will affect the amount of alkali that will be needed to neutralise the acid. If the alkali has a concentration of 2 mole and the acid has a concentration of 1 mole only half the amount of alkali would be needed to neutralise the acid. The amount of the acid. The more acid there is the more alkali will be needed to neutralise it. This is because the volume of acid has increased therefore the volume of alkali needed to neutralise it will need to increase. ...read more.


Diagram Method 1)Set up equipment as shown in the diagram. 2)Add alkali to the acid until the indicator shows that it is neutral. 3)Record the results in a table. 4)repeat the experiment using a different concentration of acid. Safety wear safety goggles to protect eyes. Results Concentration of acid (mole) Alkali neutralise needed to acid (ml) 1 2 3 average 2.0 40.05 40.60 39.95 41.85 1.7 34.95 35.95 35.70 35.30 1.5 30.20 31.10 30.45 30.40 1.0 20.00 19.95 20.00 20.00 0.5 11.00 10.10 10.00 10.05 Conclusion I have came to the conclusion after carrying out this experiment that, the higher the concentration of acid, the more alkali is needed to neutralise it. This conclusion supports my hypothesis and prediction. ...read more.

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