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How does the outside sugar concentrate affect potato cells?

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Introduction

How does the outside sugar concentrate affect potato cells? Aim: My aim for this experiment is to see the results of potato tissue's mass difference, when placed in different concentrations of sugar solutions. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Definition: Osmosis is the passage of water molecules from a weaker solution into a stronger solution, through a partially permeable membrane. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Osmosis is defined as the movement of water molecules from an area of high water concentration to an area of low water concentration, across a semi-permeable membrane. In a high concentration of water the amount of solute (e.g. sugar) is low. This could be called a weak or dilute solution. In a low concentration of water the amount of solute (e.g. sugar) is high. This could be called a strong or concentrated solution. When a semi-permeable membrane the water divides two such solutions will move from the area of high concentration to the area of low concentration, until both sides are equal. This can be seen in living cells. The cell membrane in cells is semi-permeable and the vacuole contains a sugar/salt solution. ...read more.

Middle

With the potato in 2 grams of sugar solution, I don't think there will be much change in the weight of the potato. This is because there isn't much difference between the two substances. I believe that the weight and the size of the potato won't be altered much. The 4-gram solution of sugar, similar to the 2 grams of sugar, compared to the potato, both substances have very close concentration. And that is why I am predicting that the weight of the potato in this experiment should be decreased by only a little bit. The 6-gram solution of sugar, I think, should make a big difference now, noting that it should be a large difference between the two concentrations. And therefore the weight should decrease, at least noticeable for you to notice. Also anything above that you will notice. The difference between the water concentration in the potato and the 8-gram solution of sugar is big, and the water in the potato should be transferred from the potato, through the permeable membrane, to the solution nearby the potato. ...read more.

Conclusion

and then adding the amount of sugar for each beaker according to the amount of sugar concentrate I want, and labelling each solution reading 2g, 4g, 6g, 8g, 10g...etc.... The pieces then go into the different beakers. Once the potato pieces have been left in the different solutions they will have to be left there for 24 hours. Then the potato pieces will be removed from the different beakers, and surface solution on the potato will be removed using paper towels. I will then measure the potatoes again, recording its change in mass by weighing them. I will then be taking the readings of each concentration. As it is difficult to get the cut potato pieces to the same mass it was decided that I would use a percentage change in mass, which will be used to compare the data in the results, as, this would be far more accurate. I will do this by taking the difference in mass; divide it by the mass before of he potato and multiplying it by 100. After 24 Hours Concentration 2g 4g 6g 8g 10g Weight g g g g g ...read more.

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