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How Does the Shape of a Resistance Wire affect its resistance?

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Introduction

How Does the Shape of a Resistance Wire affect its resistance?

I am going to see how the shape of a resistance wire affects its resistance. To do this, I will investigate how the length and thickness of the wire affects the resistance by doing two different experiments.

Plan

Equipment for both experiments:

Power Supply

Resistance wire (1m)

Crocodile Clips

5 Wires

Ammeter

Voltmeter

Diagram:

Method for Experiment 1 (for investigating how the length of the resistance wire will affect its resistance):

  1. Gather equipment and set up as in the diagram above.
  1. Set the power supply to D.C. and 2 volts and switch on the power supply.

3. Read and record the ammeter and the voltmeter in the table.

  1. Repeat steps 2 and 3, another four times, each time moving the crocodile clips so that 10cm more of the resistance wire is included in the circuit (i.e. the second time you do steps 2 and 3 there should be 20cm of resistance wire included in the circuit.)
  2. Then repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 to get a second reading for each length of the wire.
  3. If the second reading is the same or is close to the first reading that was taken on the ammeter and voltmeter, then there is no need to repeat it again. If the 2 readings are not close, then repeat steps 2 and 3 for a third time for that length of resistance wire.
...read more.

Middle

Average

Resistance

Thickness

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

(In Ohms Ω)

1

2

4

6

8

Results

Experiment 1

1st Reading

2nd Reading

3rd Reading

Average

Resistance

Length

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

(In Ohms Ω)

10cm

1.7

1.0

1.7

1.0

1.7

1.0

1.7

1.0

1.7

20cm

1.9

0.70

1.9

0.69

1.9

0.70

1.9

0.7

2.71

30cm

2.0

0.47

2.0

0.50

2.0

0.49

2.0

0.49

4.08

40cm

2.0

0.39

2.0

0.37

2.0

0.38

2.0

0.38

5.26

50cm

2.05

0.3

2.05

0.31

2.05

0.31

2.05

0.31

6.61

Experiment 2

1st Reading

2nd Reading

3rd Reading

Average

Resistance

Thickness

Voltage (V)

Current (A)

...read more.

Conclusion

I tried to make my results as accurate as possible by using the most accurate equipment available. I used a ruler, which measures in millimetres when measuring the length of my wire. I also used an ammeter that measures in 0.01A for experiment 1 and an ammeter that measures in 0.1A for experiment 2. As these were the most accurate ammeters I could use for the results I was likely to get for each experiment. I kept the voltmeter on the 0-5V meter, instead of the 0-10V meter because the voltage was not likely to go much higher than 2V and the 0-5V is more accurate than the 0-10V because it is measured in 0.1V instead of 0.2V.

If I wanted to do further work, I could see how different properties of the resistance wire affected the resistance. For example, I could try seeing how different metals have different resistances and see if metal density affects the resistance.

...read more.

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