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How I can change the rate of reaction?

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Introduction

Nic Carpenter 11PF 20/9/03 How I can change the rate of reaction Planning I am going to investigate the rate of reaction between Hydrochloric acid and Sodium thiosulphate. I will do this by mixing the two chemicals together, and waiting until the two react with each, and a cloudy substances as been formed and I can no longer see an "X" that will be placed under the beaker. I will time how long it takes for the reaction to happen. The rate of reaction mostly depend s on the collision theory. This simply means how hard and how often the particles of the two chemicals collide with each other. The harder and the faster the two chemicals collide the quicker the rate of reaction will take place. The main key factors that will affect this experiment are: * Temperature: this will increase the speed of the particles so there's going to be more collisions. ...read more.

Middle

After finishing adding the whole of the hydrochloric acid to the sodium thiosulphate I will start the stopwatch. When the chemicals have reacted with each other a cloudy substance should be left, when I can no longer see the cross under the conical flask through the cloudy substance I will stop the stopwatch and record the time down. I will repeat what I have just done 3 times for each different volume of hydrochloric acid used each time. I will keep the sodium thiosulphate at 10cm� every time. Results Volume of acid used (cm�) --------------------------------------------------------------Time taken for "X" to disappear (seconds) -------------------------------------------------------------- ------------ Time 1 (s) Time 2 (s) Time 3 (s) Average (s) 15cm� 20cm� 25cm� 30cm� 35cm� 40cm� 45cm� Results I have drawn a line graph using my average results; I have also added a line of best fit to show if my results are accurate. By drawing a line of best fit it also shows me if there are any anomalous results or not. ...read more.

Conclusion

My results seem to be very reliable, with them having about 1-3 seconds approximately between them for each different volume of hydrochloric acid used. My three results taken for each different volume of acid where all reliable enough to work out an average from to be used in my line graph. There was no anomalous results in my table or what showed up on my line graph. Improvements I don't believe that I could make any major improvements to my experiment due to my results been so reliable. The only real improvements I could make are: * Deciding on a fixed point when to start my stopwatch, fro example, starting it as soon as I start adding the hydrochloric acid to the sodium thiosulphate or starting after I have finished adding the hydrochloric acid. * I could also try to stop my stopwatch more accurately on the moment of the "X" disappearing which is hard to determine. * I could try to keep the solution at a fixed temperature so the particles are of the two chemicals move at the same rate. ...read more.

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