• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How quickly does amylase break down starch when we change the temperature.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE coursework science-analysing strand Jack Darby 10F1 Miss Riaz Control in animals and plants How quickly does amylase break down starch when we change the temperature. Conclusion My results show that as the temperature of the amylase and starch solution increases the rate of reaction of increases up to 40 degrees then as the temperature rises above that the rate of reaction decreases. This is what I stated in my prediction. The curve on the graph did rise and then fall as the reactant denatured, this is also what I stated in my prediction. Explain what you found using scientific ideas The higher the temperature of the starch and amylase solution up to and including 40 degrees Celsius because 40 degrees is near to body temperature and is the optimum temperature for amylase to work. ...read more.

Middle

Protein molecules are denatured by high temperatures and extreme pH. When denaturing occurs the shape of the active site is changed irreversibly and this means that the 'lock and key' mechanism no longer works. Starch is a glucose polymer linked together with other substances and in order for starch to be broken down the bonds between the starch molecule and the other substances it is bonded to need to be broken. So when the temperature of the amylase and starch solution reaches 60 degrees Celsius the bonds that the starch molecule has are not broken and this means the starch is not broken down. At the optimum temperature for amylase the bonds of the starch molecules are broken quickly and therefore there is a fast reaction rate. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reactant fits snugly into the active site and there is a high surface area of the reactant in contact with the active site. Due to this the maximum amount of starch is being broken down at any one time. Between 40 degrees and 50 degrees Celsius there is a steep rise in reaction time this is because at 50 degrees Celsius when the reactant fits into the active site only a small amount of the reactant's surface area is in contact with the active site so the reaction rate is slow because only small amounts of starch are being broken down at any one time. At 60 degrees the reactant is denatured and does not fit into the active site and the bonds between the starch molecules are not broken so the reaction that occurs is either extremely slow or non-existent. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Activity of Diastase On Starch

    Iodine works by binding to the starch. When iodine binds to the starch it will more than likely interfere with diastase activity (this effect is called steric hindrance, literally the iodine would block the starch from binding at a molecular level)

  2. How quickly does amylase break down starch when we change the temperature.

    Equipment List Diagram * A beaker * A bottle of starch * A bottle of amylase * A bottle of iodine * A test tube * 2 spotting tiles * Kettle * A pipette * A syringe * Stop clock * Thermometer Prediction I predict that the closer the temperature

  1. The effect of temperature on the reaction between amylase and starch

    (These collisions can be explained best with and by the collision theory. This theory explains that no reaction can take place without particles colliding.) The collisions are so energetic, that the hydrogen bonds that hold the proteins together to form the enzyme begin to break.

  2. How effectively amylase digests starch.

    If the iodine stays red or brown stop the experiment and record the time taken. * Do each temperature three times and then find the average. To find the average I will add together the 3 times and divide it by 3. * Repeat this experiment with nine different temperatures.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work