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Human cloning - should it be banned?

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Introduction

Human Cloning - should it be banned? In this report, I shall look at the arguments 'for' and 'against' human cloning. To do this, I will explain the different types of cloning, including cloning in plants and I will be looking at different scientific experiments and case studies on cloning, such as dolly the sheep, and evaluating whether or not it contributes to the argument. I will also include my point of view where applicable. What is cloning? * Cloning is the creation of cells, organs or whole animals using DNA from a single 'parent' cell. * The clone is genetically identical to the 'parent'. "This enables huge numbers of identical plants to be produced, but they will all be susceptible in variation." * Different types of cloning: asexual cloning, commercial cloning of plants, therapeutic cloning, animal cloning, and human reproduction. DNA strand Cloning techniques in plants: * Some plants (like spider plants) can reproduce asexually. * Asexual reproduction is a type of reproduction which does not involve meiosis, or fertilization. ...read more.

Middle

This means that she might not have died at the age of 6, but at the average age of 11 or 12. This is even more likely because the Roslin Institute decided the sheep should be put down after she developed a progressive lung disease, which is common in older sheep, so her death may mean nothing at all. * Most people will still think she needed to be put down at this age because she was a clone which makes people see the negative side of cloning rather than the positive. * It took 277 attempts to create Dolly which cost a lot of money. * Many other animals including the cow, goat, mouse and cat, after Dolly, have been cloned, but many die before birth or are born with severe abnormalities. Human cloning * Because many animals are being born with abnormalities, and the huge expenses, people are becoming very sceptical of human cloning. * Human cloning can be done but it will take hundreds or even thousands of attempts and it will cost huge amounts of money. ...read more.

Conclusion

If cloning is banned, and someone is firm on having it done, they can go abroad to somewhere where it is legal and have it done, there as the woman who gave birth to Eve (the baby girl from above). Although I am not religious, I agree with some religious people who say that if God didn't want us to use this technology, why would he let us discover it and use it in the first place? I do, although, understand why people would disagree because of their religious views and other scientific evidence: such as abnormalities and the poor successes rates. I also admit that the clone can have a premature death or develop the same diseases that the 'donor' has (or will have) at the age of the DNA being taken, as Dolly did, which could cause suffering for the clone and those around it. I believe my evidence and sources have used scientific knowledge, as 6 of the 11 are from science websites/books and the rest are from BBC News which, because of the nature of the story, uses scientific terminology and explanations. ...read more.

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