• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Human impact on the environment

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Human impact on the environment Introduction In this project I aim to explain the contributes to the environment by the actions of humans and display the consequences. I am going to divide the project into different sections and then sub sections to make the project easier to navigate around and keep the information in relevant sections. * Section 1: HABITAT REDUCTION BY HUMANS. * The building of houses and roads * Quarrying * Farming * The draining of wetland areas * Recreational uses * Section 2: POLLUTION. * WATER POLLUTION- sewage, fertilisers, chemicals and eutrophication. * AIR POLLUTION- Sulphur dioxide from burning fossil fuels leading to acid rain, carbon dioxide from burning of fossil fuels and methane from cattle and rice fields leading to greenhouse effect and global warming. * LAND POLLUTION - pesticides, herbicides, and nitrates wash into rivers and lakes affecting food chains. Habitat reduction by Humans Human beings are dependent on the Earth's diversity of species for our survival. Wild species play a vital role in the maintenance of the planets ecological functions, yet everyday on the planet 40-100 species become extinct. ...read more.

Middle

Eutrophication is when nitrates and phosphates used on farmland and sewage escape into rivers they causer excessive growth of microscopic green plants. As the rate of increasing is so rapid the microscopic animals that feed on them can't keep them in check. This causes them to die and sink to the bottom of the river or lake. This is where there bodies are broken down by bacteria which needs oxygen to break them down which is taken from the water. The water becomes deoxygenated and can no longer support the animal life, the fish and other organisms die of suffocation. It is simplified in the diagram below Here is an example of the water surface in eutrophication. Coal and oil contain sulfur, when these fuels are burned sulfur dioxide is given off into the air. Although tall chimneys of factories send sulfur dioxide into the air some of it still dissolves in rain water and forms an acid, this is what's known as acid rain it can reduce tree/plant growth and damage leaves, it also slowly dissolves limestone and mortar on buildings. This form of pollution has been going on for many years and getting worse, in some places it is destroying forests and contributing to the death of fish. ...read more.

Conclusion

Pesticides are chemicals that destroy pest's weeds and diseases, when these are used the yield (amount produced) of a crop can be dramatically increased. Herbicides are chemicals, which can be specific to destroying a species of plant or part of a plant or just to kill all plants. When an excess of pesticide/ herbicide is produced then it can badly disrupt food chains and bioaccumulation occurs. This is when insecticides are not broken down and become concentrated from one level in the food chain (Trophic level) to another in fatty deposits of top carnivores such as birds of prey. E.g. in the late 1950's sparrow hawk and peregrine populations fell dramatically due to the introduction of insecticides, this is because particular insecticides caused shell thinning and circumstantially break during laying. Insecticides also took effect on animals living in soils and on the plants etc. Conclusion Personally I fell these are all problems that should be improved on, but I fell most strongly about global warming. Although precautions have been taken to prevent this problem worsening, something need to be done as temperature increases and sea level increase are currently at a quite alarming rate and are proven to get worse and worse. Dan Bacon Biology Y10 Mr. Pockson ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Living Things in their Environment section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Living Things in their Environment essays

  1. Investigating the effect of four antibiotic agents on gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    * Divide the petri dish base into four even sections with a permanent marker pen. * Sterilise a white tile with 1% Virkon cleaner. * Transfer the Penicillin G and the Streptomycin onto the white tile. * To transfer the above antibiotic agents, flame the mounted needle and gently poke

  2. Fungal Pathogens in Humans.

    direct contact with fungal spores through a cut, and a pulmonary infection from the inhalation of spores. Both of these infections may lead to a systemic disease, affecting a number of organs such as the brain and kidneys (Kern 1985).

  1. Is the preferred habitat of moss on the North side of a Yew Tree ...

    In the classroom I checked my Mann Whitney U test a few times to ensure I hadn't made any mistakes. In the field I will steady the compass for a minute or so to ensure I am sampling from a northern direction.

  2. Global Warming Essay

    Aspect: Slopes facing the sun are warmer than those that are not. Thus south facing slopes in the northern hemisphere are usually warm whereas slopes facing north in the southern hemisphere are warmest 3.2 Human Factors affecting the climate Enhancing the Greenhouse Effect: naturally occurring greenhouse gases, as described above, keep the Earth warm enough to support life.

  1. Early Humans?

    The molar shape is similar to those of apes whereas the canines resemble an incisor, and are not sharply pointed like apes. The size of the canines is intermediate between living apes and australopithecines. Its dentition is more primitive than later australopithecines.

  2. Does life exist on other planets?

    to contain amino acids, these amino acids can group together to form a protein, this is called the panspermia theory, it was widely disregarded at first, as meteors in space would have been constantly bombarded with radiation. However due to recent findings it is now coming back into popularity among scientists.

  1. The Human Body's Non Specific Defence.

    general, become adapted to live off human skin scales and the slightly acid secretions produced by the skin. The micro-organisms tend to live in the deeper layers of the stratum corneum near to their food source. Hence, they are not normally shed with desquamation.

  2. An investigation into whether varying light intensity at a stream affects the species diversity

    low oxygen levels.v Some aquatic insect larvae and other insects have made special adaptations of a thin body covering making a direct exchange of oxygen between their body tissues and the surrounding water. Where oxygen levels are high more species will be present as more species are adapted to coping where oxygen is present and living in aerobic conditions.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work