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Human Influences On the Environment.

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Introduction

HUMAN INFLUENCES ON THE ENVIRONMENT What is deforestation? Deforestation is the removal of trees and natural vegetation from areas of dense forest or jungle. It is done primarily to obtain space that is essential for agriculture, fuel and building. However, there are many environmental issues that have derived solely from this mass extraction of wood. Wood has always been a primary forest product for human populations and industrial interests. Since wood is an important structural component of any forest, its removal has immediate implications on forest health. Intensive harvests can lead to severe degradation, even beyond a forests capacity to recover. When the soil has been stripped of its nutrients, farmers move further into the forests in search of new land. ...read more.

Middle

of the Amazon rainforest which can be seen below. What is desertification and how is it caused? Desertification is the conversion of fertile land into dessert. Occurrence is most likely in an area where rainfall is too low to support very much life or vegetation. There are many causes which lead to desertification, these include: Overgrazing - this occurs when too many animals are made to graze on land which cannot support their nutritional needs. This means that plants cannot grow as fast as the animals eat them. Removal of trees and shrubs - People often harvest plant material for fuel or building. Over cropping - This loosens the soils and increases the risk of wind or water erosion. ...read more.

Conclusion

How can these problems be solved? Of the areas in the world where deforestation and desertification has already occurred on a large scale, there is little chance of replenishment as the soil has lost any nutrition or structure it may have once had. However in places in which signs of these environmental problems are beginning to show, an attempt can be made to try and prevent matters getting out of hand, for example: * Increase supplies of water e.g. reservoir or dam scheme. This will maintain and support life on the soil. * Reduce the demand for wood by using other sustainable methods. E.g. oil burning stoves, bio-gas, solar cookers. � Sustainable development - Replanting trees, Selective logging (so that in any one area only a few trees are removed), deciduous trees can be coppiced. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

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Only two damaging effects of human activity covered but they are discussed well. More specific examples would improve this essay.

Marked by teacher Adam Roberts 05/07/2013

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