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I am going to investigate the rate of cooling in heated water. In my experiment I'm trying to find out if the rate of cooling and evaporation will change the temperature of the water.

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Introduction

Introduction. I am going to investigate the rate of cooling in heated water. In my experiment I'm trying to find out if the rate of cooling and evaporation will change the temperature of the water. My ideas are that I'll have to see if convection, conduction or radiation will occur in my experiment and if it will affect the rate of cooling and how to avoid it. And see if the diameters of the beaker will increase/decrease the rate of cooling. The things I am changing in my experiment are: The beakers top and bottom surface area by measuring the two different size beakers with vernier callipers. I would put insulations on both beakers, if necessarily, to see if the rate of cooling would be affected. I would keep the investigation safe by wearing goggles because there would be the chance that the thermometers, in the beakers of 80?C of hot water, might explode. The things I am going to keep the same in my experiment are: The amount of water. The material of the beakers. The colour of the beakers If I didn't keep any of these the same it wouldn't make a fair test because if the beakers' size was different the rate of cooling would increase or decrease, if I had one big beaker and a small beaker with the same amount of water, the larger beaker's water temperature would decrease drastically and the smaller ...read more.

Middle

down and that the particles in a liquid are still very close together but are free to move in any direction so liquids are poor conductors (from Longman exam practice kit Physics) Apparatus. All the apparatus I am going to use are: 2 different sized beaker (one with a surface area of 23.1 cm and the other with a surface area of 20.0cm) 2 alcohol thermometers 60-80 ?C (100 ml) Stopwatch Measuring cylinder. Method. 1. Get 100 ml of water pour it into 2 beakers (a safe distance between them, so no convection currents can occur.) 2. Put the thermometers in the beakers 3. Measure the temperature at the beginning then start the stopwatch. After every minute check the temperature and do this until 10 minutes has gone. 4. Draw the table and record the information once you've finished the experiment draw the line graph. 5. Do your results twice. 6. Record the information on tables for each one. Results. Results table 1. Time (minutes) Beaker with large surface area (23.1 cm) Beaker with small surface area (20.0 cm) 0 70 70 1 68 69 2 67 68 3 65 67 4 62 65 5 60 63 6 58 61 7 57 59 8 55 57 9 53 55 10 51 53 Results table 2. Time (minutes) Beaker with large surface area (23.1 cm) ...read more.

Conclusion

I could have done more work, for example to do more trial runs to provide more evidence to my prediction and conclusion. The errors I made was because I was out by 4 seconds when stooping the stopwatch as I was looking at the watch and at the thermometer at the same time so my improvement would be to use temperature probes. I have quite reliable results as they are only off by one degree in each results table but what I hoped was that the beaker with large surface area should have cooled faster. In overall I am happy with my conclusion as it proved right in both of my graphs but I could have used 3 or 4 different surface areas. If I used insulation for the experiment and different layers of insulation (1 layer for the 1st beaker, 2 layers for the 2nd beaker etc.) This would be the method for it: 1. Get 100ml of water pour it into the 3 beakers (a safe distance between the beakers so no convection or conduction currents can occur) before you do so put 1 layer for the 1st beaker, 2 layers for the 2nd beaker etc for insulation. 2. Put the temperature probes in the beakers. 3. Measure the temperature at the beginning then start the stopwatch. After every minute check the temperature and do this for 10 minutes. 4. Draw your table and record the information once you've finished the experiment draw your line graph. 5. Do your results twice. 6. Record the information. ...read more.

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