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In the first experiment we noticed how Phenolphthalein, thiosulfate and copper (II) sulfate changed their physical properties once mixed with NaOH, Iodine and Ammonia

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EXPERIMENT REPORT #5 LIMITING REACTANTS: HOW MUCH BaSO CAN WE MAKE Submitted by: Ioana Hordoan Date Submitted: 2005 I. INTRODUCTION A chemical reaction is a change that takes place when two or more substances (reactants) interact to form new substances (products). In a chemical reaction, not all reactants are necessarily consumed. One of the reactants may be in excess and the other may be limited. The reactant that is completely consumed is called limiting reactant, whereas unreacted reactants are called excess reactants. Amounts of substances produced are called yields. The amounts calculated according to stoichiometry are called theoretical yields whereas the actual amounts are called actual yields. ...read more.


Our assigned volumes of 0.20 M BaCl were 5mL and 30mL. H SO + BaCl � BaSO + 2HCl After finishing the experiment we calculate the mass of BaSO that we isolated. The results of the two trials were: 0.7g when we used 30 mL of BaCl and 0.017g when we used 5 mL of BaCl. 1. We calculated the theoretical yield of BaSO using our assigned volume. We know that: Molarity= # of moles/ # of liters, so: Trial 1. To find the number of moles we use the molarity formula: 30mL= 0.03L 0.2M = #of moles/ 0.03L = 0.006 moles of BaCl We know from the chemical formula that there is a 1/1 mole ratio between BaCl and BaSO, and that AW of 1 mol of BaSO = 233.404, so we transform moles to grams: 0.006 x (233.404g) ...read more.


We found our theoretical yield to be 0.233g of BaSO, so The percent yield = 0.17g/ 0.233g x 100 = 73% After we calculated the mass of barium sulfate that we isolated and added our results (averaged with the group that used the same volume of barium chloride) to Table 2, for the class graph of " mass of barium sulfate made vs. volume of barium chloride used". We averaged our results and drew a graph. The fact that the graph rises means that BaCl is the limiting reactant so its amount determines the product of BaSO. If the graph leveled off than BaCl would be in excess. III COMMENTS In this particular experiment we learned how to write and balance chemical equation. Further more we performed calculations involving limiting reactants, theoretical yield and percent yield. ...read more.

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