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In this experiment, I will be seeing if the length of a wire affects the resistance.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

I this experiment, I will be seeing if the length of a wire affects the resistance. The key variables to look out for, they are:

  • The temperature
  • Material
  • Length of wire
  • Wire width (SWG)

If the wire is heated up, the atoms in the wire will vibrate faster of their increase in energy. This will cause more collisions between the electrons and the atoms. The increase in collisions means that there will be an increase in resistance. As the atoms will collide more, the more time it will take for it to get to the end of the wire, as time will be wasted in collisions.

The type of material will affect the amount of free electrons that are able to flow through the wire. As materials like copper are good electrical conductors, and allow atoms to flow easily, unlike nickel.

If the length of the wire is increased then the resistance will also increase as the electrons will have a longer distance to travel and so more collisions will occur.

If the wire width is big the resistance will decrease. This is because of the increase in the space for the electrons to travel through.

...read more.

Middle

40

7

20

  1. THEN I WILL RECORD THE READING ON THE AMMETER AND VOLTMETER ONCE THE TWO START TO SHOW A READING.
  2. ONCE I HAVE TAKEN ALL THE RESULTS FOR THE TABLE, I WILL WORK OUT THE RESISTANCE FOR EACH OF THE READINGS USING THE FORMULA:   R= V/I
  3. I WILL THEN REPEAT THE EXPERIMENT ANOTHER TWO TIMES TO GIVE ME MORE ACCURATE RESULTS.

Fair test

To make sure that this is a fair test, I will make sure that the when the power supply is on, that none of the wire is touching another part. I will also keep the same piece of wire thorough out the investigation. Also I will use a ruler to check that the piece if wire is the correct length.

Safety

I will not touch the wire will the circuit is on and will not touch it for a few seconds after.

Results

Experiment 1

LENGTH OF WIRE (CM)

CURRENT (I)

VOLTAGE (V)

RESISTANCE

140

0.21

1.83

8.71

120

0.22

1.79

8.14

100

0.27

1.58

5.85

80

0.31

1.48

4.77

60

0.35

1.38

3.94

40

0.45

1.15

2.56

20

0.75

1.02

1.36

Experiment 2

LENGTH OF WIRE (CM)

CURRENT (I)

VOLTAGE (V)

RESISTANCE

140

0.21

1.81

8.62

120

0.23

1.79

7.78

100

0.25

1.55

6.20

80

0.30

1.43

4.77

60

0.35

1.37

3.91

40

0.43

1.10

2.56

20

0.70

1.03

1.47

...read more.

Conclusion

Evaluation

Overall, I think that my results were reliable, one reason is that I did the experiment three times. From my graph I can also see that I had one anomaly result, but I believe that it has not affected the overall experiment. I am also glad that I chose Constantine wire as it gave me a good range of results unlike copper, which would have given me poor results.

I also saw that I did get some odd results but that may be due to a mis-hap during the experiment, like loose connections or faulty components.

From this I can also see that this wire would not be suitable for using in power lines as it shows it is not as good as copper at conducting electricity. I am happy with the range from A to B I chose as it gave me a good range of results. On average there was a 7-ohm difference between 20cm and 140cm. Changes I could have made to give my results more reliable is to use a larger range, like 200cm. Or use a maybe use the same pieces of equipment the whole way through.

...read more.

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