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In this experiment you will determine the relative strength of acid samples, by qualitative observation of the reaction. Your unknown acid samples will be acetic acid, CH3COOH.

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Introduction

RELATIVE STRENGTH OF ACID SAMPLES INTRODUCTION: In this experiment you will determine the relative strength of acid samples, by qualitative observation of the reaction. Your unknown acid samples will be acetic acid, CH3COOH. You will react the unknowns with equal amounts of the base sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3 .The principal product of this reaction is the gas carbon dioxide, CO2. You will trap the carbon dioxide in the balloons. MATERIALS: Acid unknowns: 1. 10 ml white vinegar = 100% 2. ...read more.

Middle

1. Check your 4 test tubes. If any have chips in the rim, exchange them for new ones. Using a pencil, mark the test tubes with the letter designation of your acid samples. ONLY USE PENCIL ON THE WHITE MARKING AREA OF GLASSWARE. Obtain 10.0 ml of each unknown acid sample and place them in the test tube marked with the matching label. Place the test tubes into the test tube rack. 2. On weighing papers, weigh-out four 2.50 g samples of sodium bicarbonate and set at lab station. ...read more.

Conclusion

THIS MUST BE DONE QUICKLY BECAUSE THE REACTION WILL BE VIOLENT. Hold the balloon to the rim of the test tube until the reaction is over, or the balloon will blow off. Repeat this with the other 3 acid samples. RESULTS: 4. The gas that fills the balloons is carbon dioxide, CO2 . This is a product of the reaction. From looking at the balloons, what is the order of strength of your acid samples from strongest to weakest? How did you arrive at your conclusion? 5. How could you tell the relative strength of the acid samples from the excess sodium bicarbonate left in the test tubes after the reaction stopped? ...read more.

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