• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

In this experiment you will determine the relative strength of acid samples, by qualitative observation of the reaction. Your unknown acid samples will be acetic acid, CH3COOH.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

RELATIVE STRENGTH OF ACID SAMPLES INTRODUCTION: In this experiment you will determine the relative strength of acid samples, by qualitative observation of the reaction. Your unknown acid samples will be acetic acid, CH3COOH. You will react the unknowns with equal amounts of the base sodium bicarbonate, NaHCO3 .The principal product of this reaction is the gas carbon dioxide, CO2. You will trap the carbon dioxide in the balloons. MATERIALS: Acid unknowns: 1. 10 ml white vinegar = 100% 2. ...read more.

Middle

1. Check your 4 test tubes. If any have chips in the rim, exchange them for new ones. Using a pencil, mark the test tubes with the letter designation of your acid samples. ONLY USE PENCIL ON THE WHITE MARKING AREA OF GLASSWARE. Obtain 10.0 ml of each unknown acid sample and place them in the test tube marked with the matching label. Place the test tubes into the test tube rack. 2. On weighing papers, weigh-out four 2.50 g samples of sodium bicarbonate and set at lab station. ...read more.

Conclusion

THIS MUST BE DONE QUICKLY BECAUSE THE REACTION WILL BE VIOLENT. Hold the balloon to the rim of the test tube until the reaction is over, or the balloon will blow off. Repeat this with the other 3 acid samples. RESULTS: 4. The gas that fills the balloons is carbon dioxide, CO2 . This is a product of the reaction. From looking at the balloons, what is the order of strength of your acid samples from strongest to weakest? How did you arrive at your conclusion? 5. How could you tell the relative strength of the acid samples from the excess sodium bicarbonate left in the test tubes after the reaction stopped? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Aqueous Chemistry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Aqueous Chemistry essays

  1. Concentration of Vinegar

    All these would of lead to lower values for the concentrations of Ethanoic acid being obtained. During other procedures qualitative errors could have affected my results. For example whilst performing my titration it was difficult to get the end point of my titration exactly right especially as the vinegars were

  2. Determine the concentration or molarity of Ethanoic acid (CH3COOH) in two types of commercial ...

    The flask will be put on a white tile so the colour change of the indicator is more easily perceived. A few drops of indicator (phenolphthalein) must then be added to the vinegar. Firstly a rough reading must be taken do to make sure that the accurate readings are not overshot and a value can be noted down for this.

  1. Obtain pure samples of Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) and Ethanoic Acid (CH3COOH) from fermented Yeast (Saccharomyces ...

    The enzyme is usually larger than the substrate. They have a particular shape into which the substrate(s) fit exactly. This if often referred to as the 'lock and key' hypothesis, where the substrate is imagined being like a key whose shape is complementary to the enzyme or the lock.

  2. You are provided with a sample of vinegar which contains approximately 5g of ethanoic ...

    This equation tells us that 1 mole of CH?COOH reacts with 1 mole of NaOH to form 1 mole of CH?COONa and 1 mole of water. According to this mole ratio, the sample of vinegar is too acidic/too concentrated to titrate against the Sodium Hydroxide solution.

  1. Analyse the samples by titration and to decide which of the samples, if any ...

    I will fill the burette with vinegar and then let the solution out until the meniscus is on the zero line. 5. Then using a pipette filler I will rinse out the pipette using the sodium hydroxide and then pour it away.

  2. Identification of an Organic Unknown.

    Safety: follow general safety procedures and take car when using matches and when lighting the splint. 8. Testing for an ester Apparatus: * Dilute sulphuric acid * Test tube * Bunsen burner * Heat mat and tripod/gauze Procedure: hydrolyse the ester by refluxing it with the dilute acid.

  1. The Relative Strength of an Unknown Acid

    For example, the error margin for the balance is 0.1g either side of the mass required. Collectively these errors can account for some of the error in my final value. I am going to calculate the maximum error for each piece of apparatus as a percentage of the value measured.

  2. Investigation to Determine the Composition of Commercial Vinegar.

    In reality, H+ is a single proton, and does not exist on its own. It always attaches to something, in water it joins to H2O to form H3O+ ions. Apparatus: Burette Sodium Hydroxide (0.1 M) Pipette Various Indicators Beakers Various Vinegars Conical Flask Deionised water White Paper Volumetric Flask Glass

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work