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Insulation Materials Experiment Method We put 100ml of water at 80C into each of 6 beakers. Each beaker had a different material wrapped around it, and we measured the amount of time taken for the temperature of the water to decrease by 10C to 70C

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Introduction

Insulation Materials Experiment Method We put 100ml of water at 80�C into each of 6 beakers. Each beaker had a different material wrapped around it, and we measured the amount of time taken for the temperature of the water to decrease by 10�C to 70�C. We used a thermometer to measure the temperature of water and a stopwatch to measure tha amount of time taken. Results Time taken for each attempt (seconds) ...read more.

Middle

The cotton material was the least effective insulator - at an average of 169 seconds it took the least time to allow enough heat energy to escape for the water temperature to fall by 10�C. These results can be backed up by scientific explanation. Bubblewrap is an effective insulator because each of the bubbles contains air. Air is a very poor conductor of heat because the particles are so spaced out that heat, which is transferred by particles causing bordering particles to vibrate more, cannot transfer quickly through the particles. ...read more.

Conclusion

To measure the results, the scientific equipment used included a thermometer and a stopwatch, so except from possible minor timing errors with the stopwatch our experiment was quite accurate. Our data was fairly valid because we were also using only one independent variable (the material which the beaker was wrapped in), and we did find which was the best insulator, which is the question that we were trying to answer. However, because the experiment was not a fair test we can not say that our results are completely valid. ...read more.

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