• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Investigate the effect of changing the concentration of a catalyst on the rate of a reaction.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigate the effect of changing the concentration of a catalyst on the rate of a reaction. Introduction We must produce a piece of coursework investigating the affect of changing the concentration of a catalyst on the rate of a reaction. The rate of reaction is a change in the concentration of a reactant or product per unit time. There are five factors, which can affect the rate of reaction, according to the collision theory of reacting particles: * Temperature * Concentration * Pressure * Surface area * Catalyst I have chosen to investigate the effect that different concentrations of catalyst (Copper sulphate) have on this reaction. I am going to record the Hydrogen given off in the solution. Concentration: The concentration of a substance, normally a solution, is the amount in a given volume. Concentration= amount volume In a higher concentration solution there are more particles to react therefore there are more collisions. As a reaction depends on collisions happening, more collisions lead to faster reaction rate. If I was doing a reaction with acid and we double the number of collisions and therefore are likely to double the reaction rate. Low concentration High concentration Planning I was given to work with: Zinc (10x10 cm) Sulphuric acid Catalyst- Copper sulphate (solid/solution) Zinc is 6th in the reactivity series, so it is a reactive metal, and reacts well with a dilute acid. ...read more.

Middle

4. Dilute Copper Sulphate (Same order) Time (min) Amount of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 0 (no hydrogen given off) 2 1.5 3 4.5 4 8 5 11.5 I looked at the table of results and found that using solid copper sulphate gave off more hydrogen than dilute copper sulphate. I also found that my prediction was right. I decided then that I use solid copper sulphate. I changed the grams of the copper and the volume of water. I also decided to only do up to 3 minutes instead of 5 minutes because we were running out of time. Experiment 1 Sulphuric acid (ml) Copper Sulphate (g) Zinc (cm) Water (ml) 1. 20 1.5 5 13.5 2. 20 2 5 13 3. 20 2.5 5 12.5 4. 20 3 5 12 5. 20 3.5 5 11.5 6. 20 4 5 11 Results 1. Time (min) Amount of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 3 2 10 2 22.5 Average amount of gas given off: 11.83 cm3 2. Time (min) Amounts of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 8 2 13.5 3 19.5 Average amount of gas given off: 13.7 cm3 3. Time (min) Amount of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 2.5 2 7 3 13 Average amount of gas given off: 7.5 cm3 4. Time (min) Amounts of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 3.5 2 8.5 3 14 Average amount of gas given off: 8.5 cm3 5. ...read more.

Conclusion

Amount of hydrogen given off (cm3) 1 3 2 8 3 18 Average amount of gas given off: 9.6 cm3 When I did the experiment twice again, it showed that it followed the general pattern and their averages were approximately the same so they were correct. Evaluation I found out that more hydrogen is given off when the catalyst is in solid form than liquid form. I also found that the more catalyst you put in the more hydrogen that should be given off. However, two of the experiments did not follow the general pattern because the hydrogen given off was higher or lower than expected. The experiment with 0.16g of copper sulphate average was 5.63 cm3, while the experiment with 0.15g of copper sulphate average was 8.83 cm3. This did not follow the general pattern because the average was meant to be higher than the 0.15g of copper sulphate experiment. The experiment with 0.19g copper sulphate was the same as well. Its average was lower than expected as well. I thought think that the surface area in our method might have limited me. Because the zinc all had to be flat surfaced and not on top of one another, but I had to be careful to check that it was not. I think that the copper sulphate would have been probably not the weigh that we wanted, because when we put it into the sulphuric acid, there were still bits left on the paper we used to carry it from weigh scale to weigh it. We could have improved it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Chemistry copper sulphate and zinc

    3 star(s)

    From the lines of best fit (marked as 'linear' on the legend) we can see that one of my predictions was wrong. I predicted that the greater the amount of zinc, the faster the rate of reaction. This is untrue, as we can see from both graphs that the cup

  2. Studying the reaction between zinc and copper (2) sulphate solution.

    I constantly measured the temperature of the solution, then when the temperature had stopped rising I marked down the maximum temperature reached. I could then work out the temperature rise using the maximum and minimum temperatures and put the results into the table.

  1. The Effect of Catalase in the Breakdown of Hydrogen Peroxide

    As the burette is held upside down, by the clamp stand, it means that the tap would be at the top and the opening section would be at the bottom where the delivery tube would be put under. This means that I would be recording the results upside down, therefore; it is possible to write the wrong results.

  2. Investigating the reaction between zinc and copper sulphate

    First, I had to work out how many moles there are in 25ml of copper sulphate at 0.5M. We need to convert the 'ml' units into 'dm' units. I therefore divided the 25 into 1000. I timed this answer by how strong the concentration of the copper sulphate was, 0.5M.

  1. Rates of reactivity.

    * Tripod - to place the water bath on. * Water bath - contains water with a test tube. * Test tube - needed to place the sulphuric acid and the magnesium strip, for the reaction to take place. * Bunsen burner- needed to keep the temperature constant. * Stop watch * Bulb and pipette - to measure the amount of sulphuric acid to be used.

  2. An Investigation of the Effect of Copper Sulphate on Catalase Activity.

    Examples include, mercury (Hg2+), silver (Ag+), and copper (Cu2+). Cu2+ is found in copper sulphate. It is Cu2+ which binds with the catalase molecule in one place and alters its structure and properties in another area on the protein. This is known as an allosteric effect.

  1. Investigation of Electrolysis of Copper (II) Sulphate Solution Using Copper Electrodes

    30 seconds allow the magnesium to fully react with the Hydrochloric acid before the reaction stops and starts giving the same results. The temperatures I am going to use are 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60�C. I will use these temperatures because it seems like a good range to get a wide variety of results.

  2. Investigating the effect of copper sulphate on the rate of reaction of the break ...

    0ml cop sulphate (Vol.of O2 produced) 0 0 0 15 0.7 2.4 30 1.5 4.6 45 2.2 6.5 60 3.1 8.0 75 4.0 9.8 90 4.8 11.5 105 5.8 13.5 120 6.7 15.7 135 7.5 17.0 150 8.6 18.2 165 9.2 19.5 180 10.1 20.6 195 11.0 21.7 210 11.7 22.8 225 12.4 24 240 13.2

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work