• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Investigating a Cantilever.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigating a Cantilever Research A cantilever is a beam fixed at one end only. They are often used in every day life in structures such as cranes, diving boards and football stadiums. Factors that effect the deflection of a cantilever are mass, length and load. 3 forces affect a cantilever's deflection; these are gravitational forces acting upon the mass and load of a cantilever a compressional force acting on the underside of the cantilever and a tensional force on the upper side of the cantilever. If the cantilever deflects too much it will break. This is either because it is too long or too much weight is acting upon it. Tensional Force Compressional + Tensional Force Compressional Force Weight (Mass x Gravitational Force) I'm going to investigate how changing the load will effect the deflection of the cantilever. Preliminary Test The Preliminary test was taken to find the optimum length of the cantilever for our investigation, a compromise between a very large and very small deflection, one that was measurable and easy to take readings off of. ...read more.

Middle

I will take readings at 5 different masses 3 times per mass and work an average from the 3. This ensures that the final measurement is accurate. The readings will be taken at 100g, 200g, 300g, 400g, and 500g. We will make the test a fair test by making sure that the aspects of the test are non-variable such as the length of the cantilever and the we use the mirror every time to read the measurement. Prediction I think that as the mass of the load increases the deflection of the cantilever will increase proportionally. I think that this will happen because as the compressional and tensional forces (which support the weight of the cantilevers load) increase the cantilever deflects. Length (cm) Mass (g) Start Height (mm) Finish Height (mm) Deflection (mm) Average (mm) (1dp) 50 100 1. 850 2. 850 3. 850 1. 845 2. 844 3. 844 1. 5 2. 6 3. 6 5.6 50 200 1. 850 2. 850 3. 850 1. 839 2. 837 3. 837 1. ...read more.

Conclusion

The odd results came from things such as a member of our group knocking the pin as they took the load on and off or the steadiness off my hand. To prevent this from happening we could have attached the pin to the cantilever more efficiently, it could have been tied on with string. Also a different member of the group could have taken the results, a member with a steadier hand. Ways that you could improve the experiment are you could tie the pin on with string to avoid knocking it. You could also, with a clamp and a stand make sure that the ruler was always at a 90� to the floor and that it was always in exactly the same place. You could make the results more accurate by taking 5 readings instead of 3 per weight and take an average from that. I would extend the experiment by changing the material of the cantilever to plastic, metal or a different type of wood. I would also try taking readings at 10g intervals instead of 100g. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a well written report on an investigation.
1. The background section is very concise and well researched.
2. The preliminary results is relevant to set up the investigation.
3. The method and results are well structured.
4. The analysis section is well written but brief.
5. The evaluation contains good suggestions but the language used is not as concise as previously.
**** (4 stars)

Marked by teacher Luke Smithen 22/05/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Physics Lab - Conservation of momentum

    Consequently the momentum before the collision and after the collision for each cart can be calculated using the formula ' Momentum = mass x velocity ' 10) Using this one can investigate the principle of conservation of momentum accordingly. Note : for this method four stopwatches shall be required.

  2. Bouncing Ball Experiment

    in a vacuum all you need to know in order to know how high the ball will bounce to is h1 and CR. CR can be found out by looking at a graph, the gradient, as a percentage of 1 gives the amount of energy conserved and therefore CR can be found without knowing v22 or v12.

  1. Investigation is to see how changing the height of a ramp affects the stopping ...

    FURTHER INVESTIGATION I could extend this experiment further; I could also use different mass cars to see how that will affect the stooping distance. Furthermore, I can change different variables, e.g. speed of car, surface, aerodynamic ness of the car, etc.

  2. The effect of the temperature on the viscosity of the syrup.

    Stir the syrup and heat it until it reaches to a temperature of 800 8) Remove the beaker from the electric heater and place it on top of the stand 9) Measure the vertical part (length) of the beaker that is only filled with the syrup 10)

  1. physics lab- moment

    Results: Raw Data Table- Table of Weights according to the Different Lengths Length(m)(+/- 0.0001m) Force(N) (+/-0.001N) Trial 1 Trial 2 0.90 0.75 0.75 0.85 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.85 0.85 0.75 0.90 0.90 0.70 1.00 0.95 0.65 1.05 1.00 0.60 1.15 1.15 0.55 1.25 1.25 0.50 1.30 1.30 Processed Data- Table of Readings using 1/d Formula 1/d (+/- 0.01cm)

  2. Hooke's Law Lab

    - The metre rule used must be calibrated uniformly and it should be kept parallel to the suspended spring while taking the readings. - All readings must be taken at eye-level. - The clamp stand used must be very stable so that the suspended spring doesn't oscillate during the experiment is being performed and thus to prevent anomalous results.

  1. Helicopter Investigation.

    paperclip to it and then drop it from a height of five metres. * I will record the time from when I drop it until it hits the floor, in addition to this I will note down the time when it starts spinning (terminal velocity).

  2. Viscosity - Comparing the viscosities of different liquids.

    Using the G clamp I will attach the clamp stand to the table and make sure that it is in level and stable. Then I will clamp the cylinder on the clamp stand and ensure that it doesn't slip out.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work