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Investigating Bubble Wrap as an Insulator

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

OBSERVATION

Results

An Experiment With A Bag Covering the Can

Minutes

First Experiment

Second Experiment

Average

Starting Temperature

84

84

84

1

82

82

82

2

80

79

79.5

3

78

77

77.5

4

76

75

75.5

5

75

73

74

6

74

72

73

7

72

71

71.5

8

71

70

70.5

9

70

69

69.5

10

69

67

68

Range

15

17

An Experiment No Covering On The Steel Can

Minutes

First Experiment

Second Experiment

Average

Starting Temperature

84

84

84

1

81

79

80

2

80

78

79

3

79

76

77.5

4

78

75

76.5

5

77

74

75.5

6

76

73

74.5

7

75

72

73.5

8

75

71

73

9

74

70

71

10

73

70

71.5

Range

11

14

An Experiment With A Big

...read more.

Middle

Range

10

12

An Experiment With A Big Bubble Wrap Facing In, Covering The Can

Minutes

First Experiment

Second Experiment

Average

Starting Temperature

84

84

84

1

83

83

83

2

82

82

82

3

82

81

81.5

4

81

81

81

5

80

80

80

6

78

79

78.5

7

77

78

77.5

8

76

77

76.5

9

75

76

75.5

10

74

75

74.5

Range

10

9

An Experiment With A Small Bubble Wrap Facing Out, Covering The Can

Minutes

First Experiment

Second Experiment

Average

Starting Temperature

84

84

84

1

82

82

82

2

81

80

80.5

3

80

79

79.5

4

78

78

78

5

77

76

76.5

6

76

75

77.5

7

75

74

74.5

8

74

74

74

9

73

73

73

10

72

72

72

Range

12

12

An Experiment

...read more.

Conclusion

I was not happy with my results with my results for “no covering” at 1 minute (marked orange circle) because of all the reasons above. These reasons are why my graph a bit out of shape.

Although my graph was not accurate, my results were reliable to prove my prediction. My results clearly show that the big bubble wrap was the best insulator (and a bad conductor) and the experiment with the bag was the worst insulator (and a good conductor).

I could make my results better by repeating the whole experiment again but this time using all the suggested I have given. If I were to do this then I would get the accurate results and prove that the experiment “without covering” would be the worst insulator. I would do the experiment three or four times to get a better and more reliable average.

My results are not sufficient to prove my conclusion. I think I would have to do the experiment with “no covering” again to at least make my conclusion right.

...read more.

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