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Investigating Burning Fuels

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Introduction

Burning Fuels Method I will heat a copper calorimeter of water to 70? C using four different fuels. I will weigh each of the fuels before and after heating the water so that it I possible to investigate the relationship between the efficiency of the four fuels. For this experiment, I will need: * For different fuels in spirit burners * Tripod and gauze, * Thermometer, * 15ml Water, * Set of scales, * Copper Calorimeter. Before I start I must consider the most important factors in this experiment. The weight of the fuel burnt is important because it will allow me to compare the amount of fuel used for each different type of fuel. The increase in water temperature is also important. I must heat the water to 70 degrees centigrade only; the time that this takes is irrelevant since we are only looking at the amount of fuel used, not how fast it is used. ...read more.

Middle

Based on this information, I would expect positive correlation between the number of hydrogen-carbon bonds and amount of fuel that is burnt used to heat the water, as the fuels with more bonds would use up more fuel. I would expect the least efficient fuel to be Butanol and then in ascending order, Propanol, Ethanol and finally Methanol. Results Fuel Before (g) After (g) Difference (g) Average (g) Propanol 201.33 196.24 5.09 196.24 189.63 6.61 189.63 182.9 6.73 6.14 Butanol 177.8 170.01 7.79 170.01 160.16 9.85 160.16 152.1 8.06 8.57 Ethanol 185.71 182.11 3.6 181.58 178.02 3.56 178.02 175.52 2.5 3.22 Methanol 156.36 152.76 3.6 147.76 141.25 6.51 141.25 135.98 5.27 5.13 These results show that more Butanol was least efficient, then in ascending order, Propanol, Methanol and surprisingly Ethanol was the most efficient, heating the water whilst only using 3.22 grams of fuel. If we put these results into a graph, we can compare the number of hydrogen-carbon bonds to the efficiency of the fuel. ...read more.

Conclusion

When the new bonds are formed, this is an exothermic process. This means that energy is given out. A chemical reaction involves certain bonds breaking and certain bonds forming. If the energy taken in when the bonds break is greater than that given out when the bonds form then the reaction is endothermic. If the energy given out when the bonds from is greater than that taken in when the bonds break, then the reaction is exothermic. Burning fuels is a very good example of an exothermic reaction. A lot of energy is given out when fuel burns, but a small amount of energy needs to be added to start the reaction. After this the energy released by the reaction is enough to keep it going. Different fuels give off different amounts of energy. This is because particular bonds release set amounts of energy when they form (and take in set amounts of energy when they break.) This means that substances with different composition and bonds will give out different amounts of energy. ?? ?? ?? ?? Burning Fuels - 26/04/2007 ...read more.

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