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Investigating Friction

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Introduction

Jack Chen

10KM

Physics

P5B Assessed Practical – Investigating Friction

Purpose: In order to understand why a force is needed to keep something moving. It is important to understand something about the force of friction. I investigated the force of friction between a block and my work surface. To find out the relationship between the amount of mass and the force needed to move it; to find out if a block of a different material can affect the force needed.

Plan: See the attach page.

Modifications: I should do more trials to prove if my data is accurate or not while I said only do one trial in the original plan. The methods of both questions should change because I did not mention the reason why I was doing each step.

Method for question 1: Set up the apparatus like the above diagram (see the plan), with a 100g mass on the block (to see how much force we need to move 100g).

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Middle

1.2

0.1

3.5

0.2

1.4

0.2

4.0

0.3

1.6

0.3

4.5

0.4

1.8

0.4

5.0

0.5

2.0

0.5

5.5

0.6

2.2

0.6

6.0

0.7

2.4

0.7

6.5

0.8

2.6

0.8

7.0

0.9

2.8

0.9

7.5

1.0

3.0

1.0

8.0

P.S. The table in question 1 cannot compare with the table in question 3. This is because although all of those three blocks have the same thickness, they dun have the same weight. The block in questions is much heavier than the one in question 1. Question 1 and question 3 are totally independent to each other.

Analysis: Please see the attach pages for the graphs. From the first graph, we can obviously see that the force is increasing at constant values (0.3 Newton) as more masses are put on. From the second graph, we can clearly see that we need more force to move the masses on the cork block than the masses on the metal iron block. The force needed for metal iron block to move masses is increasing at constant values (0.2 Newton) while the force needed for cork block to move masses is increasing at constant values (0.5 Newton).

Conclusion: The results proved that my hypothesis was right. The strength

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Conclusion

ass="c28 c46">Friction coefficients can be used to calculate the effects of friction on stationary or moving objects. Static friction prevents two stationary objects in contact from moving, while kinetic friction slows the movement of one object in contact with another surface. The amount of friction, and therefore the size of the friction coefficient, depends on the materials that make up the contacting surfaces.


MATERIALS IN CONTACT

COEFFICIENT OF STATIC FRICTION*, S

COEFFICIENT OF KINETIC FRICTION*, K

Wood on wood

0.5

0.3

Waxed ski on snow

0.1

0.05

Ice on ice

0.1

0.03

Rubber on concrete (dry)

1.0

0.8

Rubber on concrete (wet)

0.7

0.5

Glass on glass

0.94

0.4

Steel on aluminum

0.61

0.47

Steel on steel (dry)

0.7

0.6

Steel on steel (lubricated)

0.12

0.07

Teflon on steel

0.04

0.04

Teflon on Teflon

0.04

0.04

Synovial joints (in humans)

0.01

0.01

* These values are approximate and intended only for comparison.

...read more.

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