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Investigating the effect of temperature on the rate of photosynthesis

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Investigating the effect of temperature on the rate of photosynthesis Contents Page Abstract:............................................................................... Aim:.................................................................................... Introduction:.......................................................................... Light dependent reactions in photosynthesis- Cyclic photophosphorylation............................ Non-cyclic photophosphorylation...................... Light independent reactions of photosynthesis................. Factors affecting the rate of photosynthesis..................... Limiting factors..................................................... Prediction:.............................................................................. Preliminary experiment: Method............................................................... Results ............................................................... Evaluation............................................................ Apparatus:.............................................................................. Method:................................................................................. Diagram:............................................................................... Safety:................................................................................... Key variables:.......................................................................... Results:.................................................................................. Graphs:................................................................................... Conclusion: T-test for 0oC and 35oC............................................. T-test for 0oC and 65oC............................................. T-test for 35oC and 65oC............................................ Discussion............................................................. Evaluation: Anomalous results................................................... Limitations............................................................ Significant limitation................................................ Accuracy.............................................................. Reliability............................................................. Errors and their effects.............................................. Improvements........................................................ Abstract: Before starting my investigation on how temperature affects the rate of photosynthesis I carried out some research into photosynthesis. From this initial research I made a prediction based on the evidence that I found about the enzyme rubisco that is used in the dark stages of photosynthesis, and also on the limiting factors of light intensity, carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. I then went on to carrying out a preliminary experiment from which I learnt the factors that made the investigation inaccurate, therefore improving on them for my actual experiment. During my actual experiment I used 7 different temperatures ranging from 0oC- 65oC. The elodea was placed in these temperatures and a light shone on them for 5 minutes. The elodea was attached to a scale and syringe that was used to pull through oxygen bubbles so we could measure the rate of oxygen released and relate this to the rate of photosynthesis. I found that the rate of photosynthesis increased with temperature. The temperature peaked at 42oC, after this point the rate started to decrease. We collected a class average and did 3 T tests to compare 2 sets of results. The T test allows us to see whether the means of the sets of data differ significantly. I am 95% sure that there is a significant difference in my results between 0oC and 35oC, 0oC and 65oC, and 35oC and 65oC. ...read more.

Middle

The time to allow the elodea to photosynthesis will be kept the same; this will be 5 minutes and will be measured using a digital stop clock, as this is more accurate than a non-digital stop clock. We will try to keep the amount of sodium bicarbonate the same, at 2g that will b measured using scales. It will be added to the water by a spatula. The amount of spatulas of sodium bicarbonate will be kept equal throughout all experiments. The light intensity will be kept the same, by keeping the lamp an equal distance from the elodea in each experiment. This will be done by measuring the distance between these using a ruler (correct to 1mm), and also using a light intensity meter. Results Table of results showing the average rate of oxygen produced at different temperatures Temperature (oC) Length of bubble in 5 minutes (mm) Volume of oxygen made in 5mm (mm3/ 5mins) Rate of oxygen produced per min (mm3/ min) Average rate of oxygen produced (mm3/ min) LUX (light intensity value) 1-10 1-dimmest 10-brightest 0 0 R 0 R2 0 1 1 0 2.01 2.01 0 0.4 0.4 0.27 7 7 6 15 15 R 15 R2 6 7 5 12.06 14.07 10.05 2.41 2.81 2.01 2.41 6 6 6 25 25 R 25 R2 15 16 15 30.16 32.17 30.16 10.55 6.43 6.03 6.16 6 6 6 35 35 R 35 R2 70 67 66 140.74 108.57 132.7 28.15 21.71 26.54 27.21 6 6 6 45 45 R 45 R2 80 91 88 160.85 182.97 176.93 32.17 36.59 35.39 34.72 7 7 7 55 55 R 55 R2 21 21 24 42.22 42.22 48.25 8.44 8.44 9.65 8.85 7 7 7 65 65 R 65 R2 9 6 7 18.1 12.06 14.01 3.65 2.41 2.81 2.95 7 6 6 Class results Average rates of photosynthesis for each group (mm3/min) Temp (oC) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Avg rate of p/s (mm3/min) ...read more.

Conclusion

over time. Temperature is measured in my experiment. Typically, data loggers are small, battery-powered devices that are equipped with a microprocessor, data storage and sensor. Most data loggers use turn-key software on a personal computer to start the logger and view the collected data. First, the data logger is connected to a personal computer. Then the turn-key software is used to select logging parameters (sampling intervals, start time, etc.) and initiate the logger. The logger is then disconnected and deployed in the desired location. The logger records each measurement and stores it in memory along with the time and date. The logger is then reconnected to the personal computer and the software is used again to readout the data and see the measurements as a graph, showing the profile over time, this will allow us to see any fluctuations that may occur. A digital light intensity meter should be used instead of analogue; this is so the light intensity can be measured in exact figures. Therefore on all experiments, the elodea can receive the same light intensity, allowing the experiment to be more accurate and fair. We could also experiment with more temperatures, this will allow our results to be more accurate, as they would be tested more and a clearer trend can be seen. These temperatures will all be between 0oC and 70oC. I would also do more repeats, if I could do the experiment again. As I have shown, the reliability of some results is low; therefore I would do more repeats for these results in particular. This will make the results more reliable. We should also use the exact same equipment for each temperature e.g. same elodea. This is necessary as it can cause inaccurate results due to different number of leaves the different elodea contain. This will affect the rate of photosynthesis, as each will have a different total surface area, therefore absorbing different amounts of light. Other equipment will also need to be kept the same so that all results will be reliable. ...read more.

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