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Investigating the effect temperature has on

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Introduction

Investigating the effect temperature has on Rates of reaction Aim: My aim is to find out the effect of temperature on the rate of reaction between sodium thiosulphate and hydrochloric acid Prediction: I think that the higher the temperature the faster the reaction will take place. This is because when heat is given to the particles, they increase in the amount of energy they have. When this happens the speed at which the move increases and they also move around a lot more. For a reaction to happen, the reactants must first collide with each other. However, just colliding is not enough. For a reaction to take place, the reactants must collide with enough energy. This is known as activation energy. Without this energy particles will not react, they may collide but they will just bounce off each other. The diagrams simple explain how the process works. In the unsuccessful reaction both particles collide but in doing so bounce off each other, and not combine. On the other hand, a successful collision is when the two particles join and form a new substance. If the particles hit each other more it is more likely they'll react. There are therefore two main ways of increasing the rate of a reaction: 1) increase the number of collisions 2) ...read more.

Middle

The graph shows an interesting and understandable trend. As the temperature increases so does the rate of reaction between the tow reactants. The rate of a reaction is the speed of the reaction. It is not "how much" of a product is made, but instead "how quickly" a reaction takes place. This can be explained using collision theory. For a reaction to happen, the reactants must first collide with each other. However, just colliding is not enough. For a reaction to take place, the reactants must collide with enough energy. This is known as activation energy. Here is a more detailed diagram of the process: Diagram a shows an unsuccessful collision, where nothing happens except form the particles bouncing apart. If the particles collide with less energy than the activation energy, nothing important happens. They bounce apart. You can think of the activation energy as a barrier to the reaction. Only those collisions which have energies equal to or greater than the activation energy result in a reaction. In my experiment the results followed this rule. For instance, the time taken for the cross to disappear at 10 degrees Celsius is just over 99 seconds, while at 55 degrees Celsius it jumps up to under 10 seconds. This is a huge gap of almost 90 seconds. This agrees with the rule that the higher the temperature the more successful reactions as the particles collide more often. ...read more.

Conclusion

The test will continue for 2 minutes, and readings will be taken every second by the computer, and automatically plotted on a graph. When the 2 minutes are up the final reading will be read off to give an idea of the temperatures speed during the reaction. The advantage of the method above is that it is a lot more accurate. Some examples of this is how readings are taken every second which will give a much clearer image of how consistent the trend may be, and eliminate the need for a line if best fit. Also, since the computer is taking the readings there is less room for human error such as missing a time or reading it wrong. Although the heating and measuring sections can have this, using a burette or pipette instead of a measuring cylinder should increase the accuracy of the measurements. In conclusion, I am very confident that my results are clear and follow a trend that is correct for this experiment. I further back this up as others who have conducted this test seem to have a graph that shares similarities to mine. Except form 15�C and 17.5�C every point laid almost directly on the line of best fit. Even these two points were very close. The same applied for my graph showing temperature against rate of reaction, overall giving me consistent, reliable results and findings. ?? ?? ?? ?? Suhail Patel Page 1 of 8 ...read more.

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