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Investigating the factors that affect a bouncing ball.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Aim:

In this investigation I will be investigating the factors that affect a bouncing ball. The part of this wide subject I will be focusing on will be the percentage energy loss.

There are many factors that can be tested in how a ball bounces. All these could be investigated. I will be testing one, and this is the percentage energy loss, but from my results I will be able to compare other things too.

Planning

I will be looking to investigate the percentage energy loss, and this will involve letting a ball fall from a certain height and measure the following peaks of the following bounces. When the ball is dropped from a certain height, depending if the conditions a right, such as type of ball, surface and the starting height, the ball will drop and bounce to a peak lower than the starting height. Then the same will happen from this lower peak, the ball will again fall and will bounce to a lower peak lower than its beginning peak. From this we can already see that there will be a percentage energy loss, from personal experiences with sports and bouncing balls. But we are also aware that from the point of first release, the ball will have potential energy equal to mgh.

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Middle

Rebound PE (J)

Percentage loss (%)

2nd Rebound PE (J)

Percentage loss (%)

Mighty ball

595

450.5

24.2857

340

24.53

595

450.5

24.2857

374

16.98

595

459

22.857

374

18.52

Ping-Pong

175

120

31.42857

289

+140 (gain)

175

140

20

102.5

26.79

175

120

31.42857

97.5

60.42

Squash ball

164.5

32.9

80

4.7

85.71

164.5

28.2

83.465

7.05

75

164.5

37.6

77.142857

7.05

81.25

Golf ball

325.5

186

42.857

12.55

32.5

325.5

195.3

40

193.5

0.92

325.5

204.6

37.142857

116.25

43.18

Ball

Start height

(cm)

Rebound height (cm)

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Conclusion

The apparatus we used meant that the test was very quick so we had more time to do more tests and work out averages to make our results better.

To improve the accuracy of the method we could do a lot of changes. First of all the experiment had too much human error involved. When the ball bounced up of the table we had to just guess and say the nearest bounce height of the ball. We could have used a video camera to look at the exact peak for each bounce. Further expeiments could include experiments to see weather changing the contact surface has an impact of the percentage energy loss.

From the graphs there are seen to be no odd results. Energy loss as a pattern went up as the drop height increased. This is what we expected so the results are seen to be quite reliable.

I think I had enough results to draw a conclusion. This was because when doing the experiment I took enough readings, and was able to make averages. Overall the results were good and good conclusions were able to be made so in my mind the investigation was a success.

...read more.

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