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Investigating the thermal decomposition of Zinc Carbonate.

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Introduction

Investigating the thermal decomposition Of Zinc Carbonate Znco3 heat Zno + Co2 (Td) Aim:- To relate the amount of zinc carbonate heated to the amount of zinc oxide produced. Planning:- The variables in this experiment are the heat, the amount of time you heat it for. The variable that I am going to investigate is the heat (temperature) of the Bunsen burner. This can be varied by having it on the blue roaring flame, (which is the hottest_ or the yellow safety flame (which is the coolest). From this it can make the zinc carbonate decompose quicker depending on which flame you use. So if it is on the yellow safety flame the zinc carbonate will take a longer time than it would if you were to use the blue roaring flame I will make sure that my experiment is a fair test by:- when I weigh each test tube make sure that the scales are on zero for every time that I weigh them. When I weigh the test tubes I will let the test tube stand for 5 seconds before I take the reading off of the scales. ...read more.

Middle

test tube take that away from the mass of the test tube plus the zinc carbonate this will give you the actual mass of zinc carbonate. Once I have done this I will find the expected mass of zinc oxide, I will do this by taking the mass of reactant and divide that by the formula mass of the reactant and times that by the formula mass of product. I will do this for every test tube. I shall heat all the test tubes until the substance has gone a very pale yellow, once this is done I will weigh all the test tubes (which are still containing the solid) after heating to get the new mass. I will then find the mass of zinc oxide obtained by taking the mass of the empty test tube away from the mass of test tube after heating. Once I have done this I can find the percentage yield of zinc oxide to do this you have to get the actual mass and divide that by the expected mass and times it by 100. Prediction:- The more zinc carbonate we start with the more zinc oxide we will get. ...read more.

Conclusion

There is a three point rise and then a drop and then a rise again. My data supports my prediction as the amount of ZnO3 increases so does the amount of ZnO. Evaluation:- When looking at my graph my results closely match my predicted masses, and so I think that my results are accurate. I could improve them by working out my results/predicted masses with a better set of scales, ones that measure to three decimal places. I think that I have one anomaly, which I have circled on my graph. I think that it is possible that I have this because I may have not given the reaction enough time in the Bunsen burner flame, which could have left some un - reacted ZnCo3 which wouldn't give me an accurate result for that one. I think my experiment went well, but if I could do it again, I would have a wider scale of measurements, ranging from as close as 0.5g to perhaps 5g then I could plot a more detailed graph, and therefore have better and more accurate results. Yes my data is reliable as it does support my conclusion. Naomi Wood 11YP ...read more.

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