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Investigation into the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

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Introduction

Biology Coursework-Investigating into the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Introduction I am investigating into how a certain factor alters the rate of decomposition in hydrogen peroxide. When yeast is mixed with hydrogen peroxide, bubbles of oxygen are produced. This is because hydrogen peroxide has been broken down into water and oxygen through a chemical reaction known as decomposition. The equation for this is: Hydrogen peroxide water and oxygen 2H2 O2 2H2O+O2 The rate of the reaction is determined by the enzyme in the yeast, catalase. This is an enzyme, which acts like a catalyst i.e. it speeds up what happens in the reaction; it is never used up in a reaction. In order to measure the speed of the reaction you apply the data to this formula: Speed of reaction=amount of oxygen made/time. Variables: * Temperature, * Concentration of enzymes, * Level of hydrogen peroxide. I will provide a brief explanation into each of the variables below: Temperature This variable will affect the rate of decomposition because, as the catalase enzymes in the yeast are heated, the molecules move around more, and collide into one another. Consequently, the hydrogen peroxide begins to decompose quicker. However, if you heat the enzymes beyond a certain point, the rate of decomposition in the hydrogen peroxide will slow to a halt. ...read more.

Middle

Method I will use the apparatus listed above in order to carry out my experiment. Firstly, I will prepare myself for the experiment so that I will be safe. I will tie my hair back, make sure there are no hazards around the workplace such as bags or stools and then I will put on my safety goggles. Then, I will proceed to set up my equipment by fixing up the sand and clasping the gas chamber and the separator in it. The separator is used so that no liquid will get inside the gas chamber, as the syringe would then stick and the results would be unreliable. I will then connect the separator to the bung which I will place in to my test tubes when carrying out the experiment. Then I will use the different measurements of yeast and hydrogen peroxide and place these into the test tube whilst quickly putting the bung in and starting the stopclock. The measurements I will use are from 1-10cm3.I I will then taking a reading off the gas chamber after a number of 10 second intervals i.e. at 10,20 and 30 seconds. However, in my pilot tests I will only collect my results after 30seconds. ...read more.

Conclusion

So, because the data all has quite strong positive correlation, this shows that the amount of oxygen produced is directly proportional to the amount of yeast enzymes. However, in every graph I can see that the very first result I took was considerably lower than the rest of the results. Each graph has this result as its single anomalous result. This anomaly was most likely to have been caused by a piece of the equipment. Perhaps it was the syringe that took a while to start moving, this could have been caused by a small amount of water getting trapped in the syringe making it stick. The only other thing in my method that could have caused unreliable or inaccurate data could be the fact that the timing of the experiment could not be absolutely accurate as I was using a stopclock to manually time it myself. Although, allowing for human error, I feel that my results, as shown, are overall very accurate. In order to improve my method in future I could use a data logger to time my results as this would be able to take a number of consistent more accurate readings. My graphs are clear and obvious, and give sufficient evidence to support my conclusion and prediction as everything in my method went as planned and I produced a set of plausible, accurate results. Biology Coursework Lauren Richardson 11G ...read more.

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