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Investigation to determine the affects of different concentrations of sugar on benedict’s solution.

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Introduction

Investigation to determine the affects of different concentrations of sugar on benedict's solution. Apparatus: 5 test tubes Large beaker filled with water Bunsen burner Tripod and gauze 10% sugar solution 2 syringes Benedict's solution Distilled water Set-up of apparatus: Method: A sugar solution was supplied. This sugar solution had a concentration of 10%. Using a clean syringe 10 cm3 of this sugar solution was placed in a test tube. Using the same syringe 1 cm3 of sugar solution was extracted from the 10 cm3. This 1 cm3 of sugar solution was placed in another test tube. To this test tube 9 cm3 of distilled water was added. This made the concentration of sugar solution in the second test tube 1%. From the 10 cm3 of 1% sugar solution 1 cm3 was extracted. This solution was added to a third test tube. To this test tube 9 cm3 of distilled water was added. ...read more.

Middle

However when the concentration was 0.001% there was not enough sugar molecules to reduce the copper sulphate, therefore there was no apparent colour change. Evaluation: There were several sources of error in this experiment which would lead to inaccuracies in the results. The first of these is the cross contamination of the different concentrations of sugar solution. The syringes that were used were not reliable because the syringe did not have a plunger that was completely intact. This meant that traces of the previous concentration were still in the syringe. This would mean that the concentration of sugar in each test tube was not the concentration that was intended. An improvement to the experimental method would be to use a new test tube for each extraction of sugar solution. A water bath was used to ensure an even distribution of heat to the 5 test tubes. This ensures a fair test. Also the water bath guaranteed that the 5 test tubes stayed stationary. ...read more.

Conclusion

From this it was possible to deduce the approximate concentration of each solution. Solution A went orange, this coincided with the 0.1% concentration from the previous experiment. Solution B went red, this matched the 1% concentration. And solution B went turquoise, this resembled the 0.01% concentration. Evaluation: The most major source of error in this experiment was the colour inaccuracies. The colour matches were only one persons perception of the colour. Another person may match the colours differently as their perception is different. The copper oxide that is formed is insoluble and therefore will settle over time. This means that the colours from the first experiment would have faded by the time the second experiment had finished as the copper oxide would have separated from the rest of the solution. To prevent this source of error the precipitates from the first experiment should have been stirred or shaken so that the copper oxide was evenly distributed throughout the solution. This would make the colours more accurate. ...read more.

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