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Investigation to determine the lowest concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution that brings full denaturation of egg albumen.

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Introduction

Biology - Planning Exercise - April 2003 Investigation to determine the lowest concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution that brings full denaturation of egg albumen. Introduction The aim of this investigation is to find the lowest concentration of Copper (II) sulphate needed to give full denaturation to egg albumen. This will be done by adding different concentrations of copper (II) sulphate to a set amount of egg albumen. Egg albumen is found in eggs and is also known as egg white, egg albumen is a type of protein. Proteins are macromolecules made up of chains of amino acids, all the bonds in a protein are covalent. Once the copper (II) sulphate solution is added to the egg albumen it causes it to denature, this can be seen by the coagulation that takes place. This is when the egg albumen changes from a cloudy liquid to a more solid, white state. The denaturation that takes place has the same resulting physical affects on the egg albumen as it would have if it were to be heated e.g. cooking an egg. The reason for egg albumen denaturing is due to the copper ions in the copper (II) ...read more.

Middle

8. Add 2cm3 of distilled water into test tube C using a 5cm3 syringe. 9. Add 3cm3 of distilled water into test tube D using a 5cm3 syringe. 10. Add 4cm3 of distilled water into test tube E using a 5cm3 syringe. 11. Add 5cm3 of distilled water into test tube F using a 5cm3 syringe. 12. Add 5cm3 of copper (II) sulphate solution into test tube A using a different 5cm3 syringe. 13. Add 4cm3 of copper (II) sulphate solution into test tube B using a 5cm3 syringe. 14. Add 3cm3 of copper (II) sulphate solution into test tube C using a 5cm3 syringe. 15. Add 2cm3 of copper (II) sulphate solution into test tube D using a 5cm3 syringe. 16. Add 1cm3 of copper (II) sulphate solution into test tube E using a 5cm3 syringe. 17. Place all the test tubes into the centrifuge. 18. Turn on the centrifuge for 10 minutes, timing using a stop clock. 19. After 10 minutes all of the coagulated egg albumen will have settled at the bottom of the test tubes. 20. Pour out the copper sulphate solution, which will be found on top of the coagulated egg albumen. ...read more.

Conclusion

The equipment I chose to use is the most available and accurate for the task. Both 1cm3 and 5cm3 syringes are needed because when measuring smaller volumes they are more accurate. In my preliminary testing I also found that not all test tubes had the same weight therefore they would all have to be weighed before adding the solutions and subsequently their weights would have to be subtracted from the final results. Safety In order to ensure that the experiment is carried out safely handle all equipment with care. When using the centrifuge make sure you are shown how to use it from a member of staff. Preliminary results My preliminary results show that the concentration used in test tube C gives the lowest concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution that brings full denaturation of the egg albumen. In this case the concentration of copper (II) sulphate used was 0.06mol dm-3. Test Tube Weight of Weight of test Weight of test tube Weight of empty tube with 1cm3 of with coagulated denatured test tube egg albumen egg albumen egg albumen A 13.31 14.58 14.58 1.27 B 13.63 14.89 14.87 1.24 C 13.76 15.21 15.25 1.49 D 13.56 14.82 13.94 0.38 E 13.71 15.02 12.56 0 F 13.41 14. ...read more.

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