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Is chlorhexidine more effective than tea tree oil

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Introduction

T-Test EFFECTIVENESS OF CHLORHEXIDINE AND TEA TREE OIL Comparison Between Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree Oil On E-Coli: Experimental hypothesis: Chlorhexidine is significantly more effective than Tea Tree Oil (as an antiseptic) on E-Coli. Null Hypothesis: There is no significant difference between the effectiveness of Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree oil on E-Coli. Comparison Between Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree Oil On B. Subtilis: Experimental Hypothesis: Chlorhexidine is significantly more effective than Tea Tree Oil (as an antiseptic) on B. Subtilis. Null Hypothesis: There is no significant difference between the effectiveness of Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree oil on B. Subtilis. In the comparison between Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree oil on E-coli, and in the comparison between Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree Oil on B. Subtilis, the values I got for t was 1.54 and 1.69 respectively. These values are below the critical value for T (2.14) for 14 degrees of freedom at the probability level of p=0.05. ...read more.

Middle

Subtilis and E-Coli); however, still appreciating that Chlorhexidine works more faster than Tea Tree oil; and thus can inhibit bacterial growth at a marginal rate than TTO. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF E-COLI AND B. SUBTILIS Comparison Between E-Coli and B. Subtilis with Chlorhexidine: Experimental hypothesis: B.Subtilis is significantly more susceptible to Chlorhexidine than E-Coli. Null Hypothesis: Both B. Subtilis and E-Coli are essentially equal in terms of susceptibility to Chlorhexidine. In the comparison between E--coli and B.subtilis on Chlorhexidine, the value I obtained for T was 2.38. This value is above the critical value for T (2.14); hence suggests that the experimental hypothesis, stating that B.Subtilis is significantly more susceptible to Chlorhexidine than E-Coli. I will accept this experimental hypothesis due to the underlying theory of bacterial cell walls and also due to the value for T which both support this hypothesis. This can be explained by the cell wall difference: When B. Subtilis is flooded with crystal violet the cell walls of this bacteria retain the purple colour (such bacteria is called Gram positive bacteria). ...read more.

Conclusion

I believe this is due to the non-polar properties of Tea tree oil, which allows it to penetrate through the non-polar outer membrane of the gram-negative bacteria (made of lip polysaccharides)- and thus able to reach phosphoric bilayer of the gram negative bacteria at the same rate that it reaches the plama membrane bilayer of the gram positive bacteria, and then cause plasma membrane disruption. I will therefore accept the null-hypothesis; however appreciating that the effect of antiseptics on bacteria does depend on the polarity of the molecule and whether or not it is working on a gram negative or gram positive bacteria. I will now consider the Mechanism of action of Both Chlorhexidine and Tea Tree Oil: Conclusions/ Points learnt (if mechanism of action is the same for the antiseptics): Gram Negative Bacteria Gram Positive Bacteria Antiseptic with more polar groups Bacteria: Less susceptible Antiseptic: Effective Bacteria: More susceptible Antiseptic: Effective Antiseptic with less polar groups (non-polar) Bacteria: Susceptible Antiseptic: Effective Bacteria: Susceptible Antiseptic: Effective ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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