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Lab Report. I measured the length and mass of 54 peanuts to prove that no two peanuts can have the same measurements

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Introduction

DCP Peanut Lab Report Introduction: In this lab, my peers and I measured the length and mass of 54 peanuts to prove that no two peanuts can have the same measurements, to further prove that each type of organism will vary greatly in size and shape. Raw Data Table: Chart of Length (+/- 0.1mm) and Mass (+/- 0.01g) of 54 Peanuts: Count Length(+/-0.1mm) Mass (+/- 0.01g) Count Length(+/- 0.1 mm) Mass (+/- 0.01 g) 1 10.5 0.69 28 11.4 0.84 2 16.6 0.93 29 11.9 0.58 3 20.1 1.23 30 10.4 0.72 4 15.5 0.70 31 11.9 0.93 5 16.0 0.90 32 11.2 0.75 6 17.3 0.69 33 10.6 0.59 7 16.9 0.50 34 11.8 0.75 8 17.6 0.81 35 11.3 0.62 9 18.5 1.12 36 10.4 0.76 ...read more.

Middle

0.82 24 12.0 1.07 51 26.3 0.83 25 11.3 0.99 52 30.0 0.84 26 11.0 0.93 53 21.0 0.92 27 11.5 0.82 54 23.6 0.96 **The data highlighted in BLUE is my own data, and the rest is of my peers Analysis: In this lab, my partners and I each measured the length and mass of 54 peanuts. The general trend was that the longer the length of the peanuts, the heavier it?s mass. The lengths were all over 10.0 (+/- 0.1 mm) and under 30.0 (+/- 0.1mm). The masses were all over 0.32 (+/- 0.01g) and under 1.25 (+/- 0.01g) Processed Data Tables Histograms of processed data in relation to the Length (+/- 0.1mm) ...read more.

Conclusion

Most of our peanuts measured between 11.9-18.5mm. The lengths all varied between 11.9-30mm with the smallest length being 10mm and the largest length being 30mm. There were no anomalies in our data. Scatter graph of correlation between Length (+/- 0.1 mm) and Mass (+/- 0.01g) of 54 Peanuts Analysis: In this scatter graph, these are the results of the lengths and masses of 54 peanuts my partners and I measured. You can see here that there is a very weak negative trend in the data. I find this strange as it is commonly conceived that the larger the length, the larger the mass of the specimen, however in my graph it shows the opposite. This can be because of inaccurate data. There are several anomalies in the data, such as a peanut that was only 12.2mm in length, but weighed 1.25g, which is the highest result for mass. ...read more.

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