• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Life In the Freezer

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

LIFE IN THE FREEZER :- Introduction :- Antarctica is the fifth-largest and southernmost continent. Its position at the South Pole, together with its elevation and ice-and-snow cover, generates the coldest climate on Earth. Its enormous ice sheet covers all but 2 to 3 % of Antarctica and extends over the encircling ocean. Wherever any organism lives it has to be adapted to living there. Polar regions are very cold so the animals that live there have to be tolerant of the cold and, if they are warm blooded, very well insulated. Polar bears, seals, whales and Penguins etc all have thick layers of blubber. The Penguins (like mammals) are warm blooded or homeothermic. This means that Penguins maintain a relatively high blood temperature of around 40 degrees Celsius. Only warm-blooded creatures like the Penguins can cope with the extreme cold of the Antarctic. During the winter in the South Pole, the sun never rises. During the summer, the sun never sets. There is only a trace of precipitation, and drifting is the primary factor in snow accumulation around station structures. ...read more.

Middle

Time (Seconds) Middle Edge 0 42 40 30 40 37 60 39 26 90 38 25 120 36 23 150 34 18 180 33 14 210 30 13 240 27 10 270 26 8 300 23 6.5 Third Set : Temperature ( * C) Time (Seconds) Middle Edge 0 42 39 30 40 32 60 39 29 90 37.5 28 120 34 24 150 33 20.5 180 30 17 210 29 14 240 27 10 270 27 9 300 26 7.5 Now, I am taking an average of the loss in temperature of all the three graphs. Loss in Temperature = Initial Temperature - Final Temperature Loss in Temperature of the Penguin in the Middle of a big group for all the three experiments (* C) Loss in Temperature of the Penguin in the Edge of a big group for all the three experiments (* C) 19 32 19 33.5 16 31.5 Average Loss in Temperature : Middle = 19 + 19 + 16 = 18 * C 3 Edge = 32 + 33.5 + 31.5 = 32.33 * C 3 Conclusion :- From the results of all ...read more.

Conclusion

Loss in Temperature = Initial Temperature - Final Temperature Loss in Temperature of the insulated Penguin for all the three experiments (* C) Loss in Temperature of the uncovered Penguin for all the three experiments (* C) 1.5 3 0 1 0 2 Average Loss in Temperature : Insulated Penguin = 1.5 + 0 + 0 = 0.5 * C 3 Uncovered Penguin = 3 + 1 + 2 = 2 * C 3 Conclusion :- From the results of all the three experiments, it can be clearly seen that the insulated penguin losses very less heat when compared to the uninsulated one. This is because due to the insulation, the temperature cools down slower. Basically the insulation means that the heat energy cannot get out as quickly. This could be by either conduction, convection or radiation. The insulation slows all of these processes. In Penguins the insulation is the skin along with a layer of fat underneath it. Therefore it keeps the penguin warmer in its cold habitat. ?? ?? ?? ?? Bargavi Rajan 10 'P' ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Living Things in their Environment section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Living Things in their Environment essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    biology instinctive behaviour

    3 star(s)

    Then imagine them being encircled by boats and nets, some drowning, all in a panic. The survivors are separated from each other and carted off to lucrative swim with dolphin programs. * Rodeos . . . Rodeo horses and bulls buck to try to release bucking straps, cinched tightly around their abdomens.

  2. Why Do Penguins Huddle

    Plan: Method: For my experiment I will be measuring the effect the amount of test tubes clustered together has on the rate at which their temperature decreases. To do this I will perform five experiments, each one a variation in the number of test tubes 'clustered' together.

  1. Investigating reflex behaviour in an invertebrate organism

    This could be because there were a lot of other woodlice on the food source in the dark area and therefore not enough room for

  2. Dog Behaviour

    While the effects of imprinting can sometimes be reversed, it takes a lot of work. A dog that had not imprinted on other dogs at an early age can be socialized, but it requires a lot of patience and effort on the part of the dog's people.

  1. : To investigate how the volume to surface area ratio affects the heat-loss rate ...

    the surface area of the test tube size used in the experiment, separate it into two calculations; the cylinder part and the half-sphere at the end. Part A Part B S.A= 2 x?? x r x length S.A= 2 x ?

  2. Does life exist on other planets?

    A planets chemical make-up is one of the cornerstones in supporting life, for example, photosynthesis- Carbon dioxide + water = glucose + oxygen The atmosphere needs to contain carbon dioxide for photosynthesis to take place, as well as many more chemicals.

  1. Grizzly Bears

    Cubs are born in midwinter in litters of 1 to 4 depending on the local food supply. Twins are probably most common overall. Mother grizzlies can reproduce until almost 30 years of age. Grizzlies can live up to 30 years of age. Though few survive beyond the age of 20.

  2. WHY DO PENGUINS HUDDLE?

    I will repeat this test to get an average set of results. I predict that the test tube in the middle will always be hotter than the test tubes on the outside because less heat will be radiated out of the side of the middle test tube so the heat can only go up through a small opening.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work