• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

My aim is to investigate how the temperature has an effect on the height of the bounce of a squash ball.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Heat on ball Investigation

Introduction Originally Gravitational potential energy (mph) is stored in a ball before its released. as  the ball falls and the speed increases The potential energy of the moving ball is changed to kinetic energy (1/2mv2) then it looses all the potential energy as soon as is touches the floor. If there is no energy loss the energy (I.e. P.E and K.E) remains the same

The ball deforms and slows down as it touches the ground. Here the balls kinetic energy is causing the ball to deform. When the ball is deformed some of the energy is stored as potential energy and another name for this energy is elastic potential energy and this in some cases this energy is changed into heat and sound and some is converted to heat and sound.

As soon as the ball losses all its speed and reaches its highest deformation only then it looses its kinetic energy and it stops moving. And when some of its energy Is changed to heat and sound its kinetic energy decreases than its original gravitational potential energy. Here all the energy (elastic PE + heat + sound) remains the same.

And then when the ball turns back into its original shape the elastic potential energy is then changed to kinetic energy.

As soon as the ball leaves the ground it will begin to slow down as it rises and its kinetic energy is changed back to gravitational potential energy. Since some of its original energy has been changed to heat and sound it will finish up with less gravitational energy than it began with i.e. the rebound height is less than the starting height.

Additional Information

A solid expands when it’s heated.

...read more.

Middle

Test 1

(cm)

Test 2

(cm)

Test 3

(cm)

Average

(cm)

1

26.0

26.0

27.0

26.3

2

27.0

27.0

27.0

27.0

3

28.0

28.0

28.0

28.0

4

28.0

28.0

28.0

28.0

5

28.0

28.0

28.0

28.0

I can see from this that thermal equilibrium was reached at 3 minutes because this was the point that 28cm at a bounce height was reached and because the height didn’t increase more than 28cm it means that thermal equilibrium was reached. This is why I am going to leave the ball in the water bath for 3 minutes for it to reach thermal equilibrium.

I Am going To investigate a appropriate height to let go of the squash ball , I will let go of  the squash ball at 20°C, 40°C and 70°C from different heights to find a height that worked well for all the temperatures. The heights I let go of the ball from were: 0.50m, 0.75m, 1.00m, 1.25m and 1.50m. To ensure the temperatures of the ball were correct I kept the ball in the water bath for 3 minutes as I understand from my earlier original results that 3 minutes is the time it takes the ball to reach thermal equilibrium.

You can understand from this  that 1 meter is a appropriate height that I can easily record all the heights down to the lowest temperature (0°C) and gives a first-class bounce height for 70°C so it satisfies both ends of the series of temperatures. This height gives a good choice of results so they can be shown easily in a graph and compared. I chose not to use the higher heights since even though they would also give a precise range of results and I would easily be able to understand the height of the ball at a 0°C temperature, it was unsuitable for my experiment since it meant that I would keep getting up onto the table to be able to reach the heights.

...read more.

Conclusion

To provide additional relevant evidence I could:

·        Use temperatures that go up in 5°C instead of 10°C so I would have more information to show the relationship between the temperature of a squash ball and its bounce height.

·        I could have a better way of seeing the bounce height by having a video camera set up about a metre away from the experiment to see where about the ball bounced and then have another camera close up to see a closer reading of the bounce height. When I play back the video, I would put it on slow motion and show it frame by frame recording the heights until the bounce heights start to fall. Then I would take the maximum recording I had for that temperature and that would be the bounce height. This would be very accurate because I would see a very close up measurement and because it would be in slow motion and frame by frame it clearly showed the bounce height and could clearly be read from the bottom of the ball. This is more accurate than using your eyes because the ball would bounce very quickly and you only have a split second to read the height and is very difficult.

MOHAMMED ABDUL KALIK SHAHEEN

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Bouncing Ball Experiment

    This is because the experiment is a very short and simple one to carry out and if conducted efficiently can be completed easily within the time span allowed for collecting evidence. It was decided that the first drop would start at 2m off the floor and then move down in intervals of 10cm to 10 cm off the floor.

  2. The effect of the temperature on the viscosity of the syrup.

    The temperature interval will be 5 every time, so 500, 450, 400, 350... to 50. It was noticed that when the sphere was removed by descending the magnet (attached to a string) into the syrup, an amount of syrup was also removed.

  1. An investigation to find how temperature affects the bounciness of a squash ball.

    This will have to be done very quickly as the temperature of the ball will start to change. Record the results in a neat table. I will then repeat this whole procedure just described for each of the temperatures shown below.

  2. Factors affecting the bounce of a ball

    The mass was not the same because different materials have varying density. ==> They were all at room temperature ==> The surface on which they were made to bounce was a constant factor (marble)

  1. Investigation into the effect of temperature on viscosity

    Gravitational field strength, 9.81ms-2 affects the ball bearing in the tube causing it to accelerate. The distance over which the ball bearing falls must be kept constant thus allowing a direct comparison of velocities. The same ball bearing must be used for a variety of reasons, the weight and volume

  2. This investigation is associated with the bounce of a squash ball. I will be ...

    = nR T This is the equation of state for an ideal gas. R is called the (universal) molar gas constant. A certain mass of a substance will tell us how many moles of that substance we will have but it is different for each substance due to its Relative Atomic Mass.

  1. How does the temperature of a squash ball affects the impact time of the ...

    Then drop the ball to cut the beam. The time that the light sensor obtains is the impact time. However, as the light beam has finite thickness, it is not accurate enough to measure the impact time. The ball may cut the beam too early and leave too late which over estimate the impact time.

  2. Squash Ball and Temperature Investigation

    A gas can be expanded or compressed. As the ball strikes the floor the bottom of the ball is pushed in. The material is pliable and deforms (bends). The compressed (pressed in) ball has less volume than the original uncompressed ball.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work