• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

My aim is to plan and carry out an experiment to investigate how the concentration or temperature of sodium thiosulphate solution affects the rate of reaction when being reacted with dilute hydrochloric acid.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Planning INTRODUCTION My aim is to plan and carry out an experiment to investigate how the concentration or temperature of sodium thiosulphate solution affects the rate of reaction when being reacted with dilute hydrochloric acid. I want to find out whether changing the concentration or temperature of the reactant (sodium thiosulphate) affects the speed of the reaction. The reaction I am going to carry out is: Na2S2O3 + 2HCl --> 2NaCl + SO2 + H2O + S Sodium Thiosulphate + Hydrochloric Acid --> Sodium Chloride + Sulphur Dioxide + Water + Sulphur The rate of reaction is the speed at which the reaction takes place. It is measured by dividing 1 by the reaction time (rate 1/reaction time). The unit for the reaction rate is s-1. The aim of the experiment is simply to see how this rate changes. FAIR TEST (VARIABLE 1) It is always important when carrying out an experiment to keep it fair. This means that what you are investigating is the only thing that does affect the experiment. For example, in this experiment when I investigate the effect of changing the concentration, all other variables must stay constant to keep the experiment fair. I must keep the total volumes of both the hydrochloric acid and the sodium thiosulphate equal. I am going to use 10cm3 of hydrochloric acid throughout for every reaction. ...read more.

Middle

MAIN EXPERIMENT (VARIABLE 1) APPARATUS: * Safety Glasses * Conical Flask * Burette * Stopwatch * Piece of Paper (for measuring when reaction is completed) * Dilute Hydrochloric Acid * Solution of Sodium Thiosulphate * Retort Stand and Clamp * Water PREDICTION (VARIABLE 2) I believe that as I increase the temperature of sodium thiosulphate and hydrochloric acid, the rate of reaction will increase. In liquids the particles are constantly moving and so constantly colliding with each other. They will normally always react when they collide with enough energy. The minimum amount of energy needed in a collision for the particles involved to react is called the Activation Energy. It is needed to break the bonds. If the particles collide with insufficient energy, the particles simply bounce off each other. If every collision occurred with energy, at least that of the activation energy, then the reaction would be extremely fast. As you increase the temperature, the reactant particles gain more kinetic energy and start to move faster. This means that there is a greater chance of collisions between the particles, since they are moving about quicker in the same volume of solution. Also a greater proportion of the particles acquire the activation energy as you increase the temperature, so more particles are able to collide and definitely react. ...read more.

Conclusion

IMPROVEMENTS There are improvements I could make to my experiment which would give even more accurate results. I could: * Take more results by doing more concentrations and more repetitions. The more I do, the more accurate my results become, but I wouldn't be able to do lots more because there is a time limit to this experiment. * Take the results to more decimal places, since this would make my graph more accurate. However, if I do lots of decimal places it would be difficult to plot these on a graph of reasonable size. * Put the conical flask in a water bath, to keep the temperature constant. The one other variable apart from concentration which can affect the rate of reaction of solutions is temperature. I did the experiment at room temperature which is about constant. However, to make the experiment even more accurate I could put each conical flask in a water bath before I add the two solutions to each other. I could put the conical flask in a water bath at around 20�C, and I would do this before each reaction to make sure it stays constant. It must be 20�C every time so that the temperature is constant, and I know that temperature is not affecting the rate of reaction. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Patterns of Behaviour section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Patterns of Behaviour essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    My experiment will be conducted to find out at what concentration does sodium thiosulphate ...

    4 star(s)

    this altered my results therefore I monitored the room temperature throughout the final investigation. You can make particles move more quickly by making the temperature rise because heat energy turns into kinetic energy. The faster the particles are going, the more energy they have.

  2. Experiment to Investigate the Rate of Reaction between Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Thiosulphate, with ...

    much better to use the same person so the results are all equal in the way they were timed. The person measuring the volumes of the hydrochloric acid, the sodium thiosulphate and the water must be kept the same throughout the experiment for more precise results.

  1. Experiment to investigate how changing the concentration of hydrochloric acid affects the rate of ...

    Observation of reaction What happens to the chalk? What is the rate of reaction between chalk and hydrochloric acid? Chalk Exothermic A lot bubbles come out It dissolves 4 If the chalk dissolves then it is not re-usable after the reaction.

  2. Design an experiment to investigate the effect of varying the temperature of Sodium Thiosulphate ...

    The results from the preliminary experiment are shown in the table below showing 'the effect of concentration on reaction time' S.T (ml) Water (ml) Conc. (g/l) % Conc. Acid (ml)

  1. How Concentration affects the rate of reaction.

    These reactants are acids, which means that they are irritants, corrosive and harmful. The product produced may be harmful if you inhale it so people with asthma should be careful. We also have to be careful when we are pouring the acids into the measuring cylinder and not onto our hands.

  2. Measuring the rate of reaction, when dilute sodium thiosulphate solution and dilute hydrochloric acid ...

    * Empty the sodium thiosulphate in the conical flask and then place the conical flask over the piece of paper with the "X" marked on it. The next few steps we had to do fairly quickly. * Add the hydrochloric acid to the conical flask, as soon as the two

  1. Factors Affecting the Rate of Reaction between Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Thiosulphate.

    Vol Sodium Thiosulphate (ml) Vol HCl (ml) Vol water (ml) Conc (molar) Time 1 (min:sec) Time 2 (min:sec) Average time (min:sec) 50 3 7 0.03 02:08 01:52 02:00 50 4 6 0.04 01:54 01:44 01:49 50 5 5 0.05 01:28 01:22 01:25 50 6 4 0.06 01:21 01:21 01:21 50

  2. How does the concentration of sodium thiosulphate solution affect the rate of its reaction ...

    When I am measuring all the solutions I will make sure the measuring cylinder is on a flat level surface and measure to the bottom of the meniscus. I will use 10cm3 measuring cylinder when measuring 10cm3 and below and I will use a 50cm3 measuring cylinder when measuring between 10cm3 and 50cm3.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work