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My aim of this experiment is to find out if the number of coulombs affects the amount of copper produced.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

I am doing an experiment on electrolysis with copper sulphate and this is what I am planning to do. AIM: My aim of this experiment is to find out if the number of coulombs affects the amount of copper produced. HYPOTHESIS: I think that the copper will be deposited at the negative cathode as the copper ions have a positive charge, so it gets attracted by the negative cathode. The sulphate, as it has a negative ion, it will be attracted by the positive anode, but as it is not a halogen, oxygen will be given off (this is one of the many rules we have learnt about electrolysis). METHOD: I am going to set up the apparatus (as shown in the diagram on page ). I will sand the copper electrodes first, and then dip them into the copper sulphate. We will use 250ml of copper sulphate solution at 1 mole concentration. ...read more.

Middle

Broken glass. 3 2 6 Make sure that you do not knock over anything and that when there is broken glass DON'T touch it. You could knock over someone's experiment. 3 2 6 Make sure that you or anyone else is not running in the laboratory. Could accidentally get copper sulphate solution on your hands and eat it. 3 3 9 Wash your hands with soap after the experiment. VARIABLES: In this experiment I am going to vary the time we keep the experiment going as the longer we keep the experiment going the higher the number of coulombs there will be. I am going to change the amount of coulombs used in the experiment by keeping each part of the experiment going for longer. TO MAKE THIS EXPERIMENT A FAIR TEST: To make this experiment a fair test I am going to weigh the copper electrodes each time I sand it and I will use the same electrodes throughout the experiment. ...read more.

Conclusion

Therefore the cathode will gain weight and the anode will loose weight. If our experiment is successful I expect my graph to look like this: A diagram of the circuit will look like this: Here the electron flow is kept going through the circuit for every two electrons taken from the cathode a copper ion, two electrons are set free at the anode by two oxygen ions. Technically the electrons freed at the anode flow through the circuit to the cathode, because metal ions are ALWAYS positive they move to the negative cathode and get deposited. Non-metal ions are ALWAYS negative (except for hydrogen) therefore moves to the positive anode and gets discharged. The copper is collected at the cathode: 2+ - 2Cu + 4e Cu and Oxygen is released at the anode because sulphate cannot be deposited and it is not a halogen: 2- - 2O - 4e O2 The anode will decompose slightly so the mass lost, will be slightly higher than the mass gained on the cathode. ...read more.

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