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n this essay I will analysing what makes us happy and be going into vast depths as to what factors affect happiness and how certain chemicals, neurotransmitters and endorphins in the brain affects this procedure.What makes us happy

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Introduction

What Makes Us Happy By John Smith In this essay I will analysing what makes us happy and be going into vast depths as to what factors affect happiness and how certain chemicals, neurotransmitters and endorphins in the brain affects this procedure. Firstly I will be assessing the key question; what is happiness? We already know happiness has many forms, but what we will be going into, is what defines happiness and how do we find this out? In order to be happy, scientists have put the ideas of many generations of people together and have come with a theory that makes us happy. [1]To begin with we must have a goal, whereby we have a point of destination we consider worthy for our effort, this goal can be really small or really big. Secondly, we also need to live our life with enthusiasm, optimism and honesty. Only after reaching all these areas, can we become happy people. For reaching the superior more advanced forms of happiness, such as achieving satisfaction and contentment, we require taking paths leading to a meaningful life; a life where through having goals, we will find fulfilment. ...read more.

Middle

They need to fulfil their basic needs for food and shelter and consequently there is no time for thoughts about cheerfulness. For the duration of catastrophic times, people do not converse about happiness, they talk about survival. The overall meaning of this is that; when people or societies do not have to worry about poverty or tragedy, they worry about happiness. Having looked at the physical aspects of happiness, we shall now look into, what chemicals in the brain that affects our happiness and the certain chemicals released in the process in doing so. [4] Endorphins are endogenous opioid peptides that function as neurotransmitters. They are produced by the pituitary gland and the hypothalamus during exercise, excitement, pain, spicy food and love and they bear a resemblance to the opiates, in their abilities to produce analgesia and a feeling of comfort. Endorphins also give the effect of power and control over ourselves, which allows us to persist with activity for an extended period of time, such as running to make ourselves healthy, which in turn makes us happy as we release this hormone. Ironically on the other hand, we must remember that this is not happiness. ...read more.

Conclusion

[7] The final steps to making us happy also include the following; religion and procrastinating. Religion is a fairly popular strategy for increasing happiness; it is reasonably well-established that religion and being happy go together. I believe the reason for this connection, could be to do with social integration, having a sense of purpose in life and becoming connected to someone, whether that is God or a higher power. Procrastinating is also a surprisingly common activity amongst us and is a happiness enhancing activity, as we tend to avoid work till the last minute. Conversely in saying so, those of us that do leave it to the last minute will not any happier that those that don't, once we take extra revision into account. We now have a good insight into what makes us happy and how to maintain this, so that overall we can become a more united and jubilant society. In conclusion to this, we can rightly say "The greatest degree of inner tranquillity comes from the development of love and compassion. The more we care for the happiness of others, the greater is our own sense of well-being." Quoted by Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lamat. In simple terms "You helping someone= someone else helping you. ...read more.

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Response to the question

The response to the question is excellent as it its presented with the utmost clarity and scientific detail. The response starts of by describing different perspectives of happiness, which allows the reader to understand how these types of happiness can ...

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Response to the question

The response to the question is excellent as it its presented with the utmost clarity and scientific detail. The response starts of by describing different perspectives of happiness, which allows the reader to understand how these types of happiness can be achieved. The response also includes different hormones and their affects, which is well above GCSE standard, hence the highest marks would be given.
Different drugs are mentioned, some in detail found at A2 level, which is excellent. Overall the response is beautifully structured, with appropriate references at the end, which show that the candidate is intelligent and aware of how to write an essay appropriately.

Level of analysis

There is an exceptionally high level of analysis throughout the essay. However, my only concern is that at GCSE it is usually a good idea to use diagrams or pictures to convey a point with more clarity, for example in this essay the candidate could have included a picture locating the pituitary gland in the brain. The analysis in the conclusion was somewhat weak, as the quote by the Dalai Lama was irrelevant to the overall essay, and the candidate should have finished at 'jubilant society'. Nevertheless, the overall essay had an excellent level of analysis, that far surpasses a normal GCSE standard essay.

Quality of writing

The highest quality of writing was used throughout this essay. There were no grammatical errors, which was good. Instead of using brief bullet points, the candidate used numbers which allowed them to go into more depth. Specialist scientific vocabulary was used throughout, which conveyed that the candidate understood the essay title with great depth.


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