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Parachutes Lab

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

-Abhirath Singh

9C

Parachutes Experiment

Aim:

  1. To determine that the surface area of a parachute can affect the time it takes to travel a calculated distance, and therefore affecting the speed at which it falls.

Hypothesis:

  1. The surface area of a parachute affects the time it takes to travel a calculated distance, and the speed at which it falls.
  2. Parachutes with a larger surface area will fall slower than ones with a smaller surface area, and will also take a longer time.

Background:

Parachutes are used by people in order to land safely from the air. These parachutes work on the basic law of air resistance. As a parachute opens up, it causes resistance against the air, causing the person using it to slow down. There are several factors that affect the way a parachute falls. These include; weight of user, force of winds blowing against the parachute, direction of winds against the parachute, material of parachute, weather conditions and surface area of parachute.

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Middle

Note down the time taken. Take minimum of 3 readings.Repeat the experiment for the following dimensions: 10cm by 10cm (100 cm2), 15cm by 15cm (225 cm2), 20cm by 20cm (400 cm2) and 25cm by 25cm (625 cm2).

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Data:

Weight of Plasticine used = 4.98 grams.

Distance traveled by parachute = 3.30 meters.

Data Table – 1

Attempt No.

5cm by 5cm

(25 cm2) (± 0.01 seconds)

10cm by 10cm

(100 cm2)

(± 0.01 seconds)

15 cm by 15cm

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Conclusion

Therefore, if a person using a parachute would want a soft and safe landing with ease, they would use a parachute with a larger surface area.

Errors and Modifications:

  1. The square cut out of polythene were not exactly a square.
  2. While the parachute was traveling, there could have been air blowing from any of the directions, causing a change in the time taken by the parachute, and therefore its speed.
  3. As the steps are not level, the parachute may not have landed one or two steps lower, making it travel a longer distance, causing a change in the time taken by the parachute, and therefore its speed.
  4. If the parachute was folded a little more than another, it would take longer to open up, causing a change in the time taken by the parachute, and therefore its speed.

...read more.

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