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Photosynthesis Simulation

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Introduction

Photosynthesis Simulation Data Collection: Tables showing the effects of carbon dioxide concentration on the rate of photosynthesis Experiments Carbon Dioxide Concentration Time to taken to measure the oxygen bubbles in seconds Number of Oxygen bubbles Produced every 30 seconds 1 7 30 16 2 7 30 18 3 7 30 23 4 7 30 29 5 7 30 30 6 7 30 31 Experiments Carbon Dioxide Concentration Time to taken to measure the oxygen bubbles in seconds Number of Oxygen bubbles Produced every 30 seconds 1 8 30 16 2 8 30 19 3 8 30 24 4 8 30 24 5 8 30 30 6 8 30 32 Experiments Carbon Dioxide Concentration Time to taken to measure the oxygen bubbles in seconds Number of Oxygen bubbles Produced every ...read more.

Middle

Dependent: the number of oxygen bubbles produced. Controlled: * The Color of the light will always be the same (white). * The time taken to measure the bubble production will be the same (30 seconds). Data Processing and Presentation: Effects of light and CO2 on the Rate of Photosynthesis The graph shows the number of oxygen bubbles produced when, light intensity and the concentration of carbon dioxide are changed. Each line has a different carbon dioxide concentration, and every different concentration has six readings. And every reading has a different light intensity. The graph shows, the higher the carbon dioxide concentration, and the higher the light intensity, the more oxygen bubbles were produced. ...read more.

Conclusion

The light independent phase also known as the dark phase, takes place in the stroma, within the chloroplast. The result of the process is the conversion of carbon dioxide into sugar. This reaction does not depend on light, however it depends on the products of the light dependent phase. With the assistance of ATP (product of light reaction) and another chemical called NADPH, the carbon dioxide is turned into sugar. The more light absorbed by the plant, the more ATP and NADPH are produced, in the light reaction. The more ATP and NADPH and carbon dioxide are present during the dark reaction, the more and faster sugar will be produced. This is supported by the graph above. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 Bashar Abu Al-Soof Vienna International School 10/31/2008 ...read more.

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Response to the question

This piece of coursework loosely answers the question, focusing more on dumping scientific knowledge about photosynthesis rather. There is no evidence of a method or a hypothesis, so it is difficult to contextualise where the results are coming from, or ...

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Response to the question

This piece of coursework loosely answers the question, focusing more on dumping scientific knowledge about photosynthesis rather. There is no evidence of a method or a hypothesis, so it is difficult to contextualise where the results are coming from, or where the destination of the experiment is. A clear hypothesis (or prediction) enables the coursework to remain focused on clarifying or disregarding it throughout.

Level of analysis

I do not recommend testing two variables as this piece of coursework has. In my opinion, it would've been much more sensible to do one set of tests with a controlled light intensity, varying the carbon dioxide concentration, and then another but controlling carbon dioxide and varying light intensity. Yes, the candidate has been able to show the correlations, but it is not the recommended way to do this. In my opinion, the results table is very ambiguous. For example, experiments 1-6 does not suggest a varying light intensity but simply a repeat. The measurement for carbon dioxide concentration is not explained, either. These simple things could be changed, but if they are not, the experiment becomes very blurred and hard to follow. I would've liked to see this essay explore the concept of limiting factors. The scientific explanation, however, is very strong, and this is a great example of how to explain photosynthesis in a concise way. It's a shame that the analysis of the experiment itself is poor.

Quality of writing

This investigation is somewhat thin on content, but what is included is written to a high standard. Sentences flow well, and grammar is used to emphasise the arguments. I liked the high level of sophistication through the way they didn't need to use the first person, a common choice of GCSE students.


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Reviewed by groat 11/02/2012

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