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Physics GCSE coursework: resistance of a wire

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Introduction

Physics coursework Background Information Resistance is the force, which opposes the flow of an electric current around a circuit so that energy is required to push the charged particles around the circuit. Resistance is measured in ohms. A resistor has the resistance of one ohm if a voltage of one volt is requires to push the current of one amp through it. Resistance occurs when the electrons traveling along the wire collide with the atoms of the wire. These collisions slow down the flow of electrons causing resistance. Resistance is a measure of how hard it is to move the electrons through the wire. Wire length: If the length of the wire is increased then the resistance will also increase as the electrons will have a longer distance to travel and so more collisions will occur. ...read more.

Middle

The units of volts are the same as joules per coulomb. Therefore, Ohms law says the more resistance means more energy used to pass through the wire. Resistance is a measure of how much energy is needed to push the current through something. The electrons carrying the charge are trying to move through the wire, but the wire is full of atoms that keep colliding in the way and making the electrons use more energy. Equipment * Wires * Battery/Power pack * Voltmeter * Ammeter * Crocodile Clips * Ruler * Resistance wire Method 1. First of all I will get together all the apparatus I need and set it up. ...read more.

Conclusion

Resistance (?) 5 1.00 0.25 0.25 10 0.90 0.60 0.60 15 0.85 0.95 1.10 20 0.75 1.20 1.60 25 0.70 1.40 2.00 30 0.67 1.60 2.40 35 0.62 1.70 2.70 40 0.60 1.80 3.00 45 0.55 2.00 3.60 50 0.52 2.10 4.00 Results 2 Length of wire (cm) Current (A) Voltage (V) Resistance (?) 5 1.00 0.20 0.20 10 0.90 0.60 0.60 15 0.85 0.90 1.10 20 0.80 1.20 1.50 25 0.72 1.40 1.90 30 0.67 1.60 2.40 35 0.62 1.70 2.70 40 0.60 1.80 3.00 45 0.56 2.00 3.60 50 0.54 2.10 3.90 With both sets of results I have rounded the results to 2 decimal places. This is so that the results are accurate and when reading them they are easier to understand. ...read more.

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